Vulnerabilities / Threats
2/28/2013
10:16 AM
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Anonymous: 10 Things We've Learned In 2013

The Anonymous hacker group continues to seek equal measures of revenge, justice and reform -- preferably through chaotic means -- for perceived wrongdoings.
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If Anonymous' exploits thrive on exploiting vulnerabilities in websites and databases, the group occasionally runs afoul of critics who apply the same techniques. Notably, the group this week saw its @Anon_Central Twitter account, which has 167,000 followers, compromised by the little known, rival hacktivist group Rustle League, the BBC reported. The hack placed the pro-Anonymous Twitter account in the dubious company of Burger King and Jeep, which had likewise had their Twitter feeds seized by unknown attackers.

"The reason Anonymous fell victim is probably human weakness," Graham Cluley, senior consultant at security firm Sophos, told the BBC. "Chances are that they followed poor password practices, like using the same password in multiple places or choosing a password that was easy to crack."

RECOMMENDED READING:

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Hacking, Privacy Laws: Time To Reboot

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Anonymous Takes On State Department, More Banks

Anonymous Says DDoS Attacks Like Free Speech

U.S. Bank Hack Attack Techniques Identified

Bank Attacker Iran Ties Questioned By Security Pros

Anonymous DDoS Attackers In Britain Sentenced

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EslamP248
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EslamP248,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/15/2013 | 10:38:40 PM
re: Anonymous: 10 Things We've Learned In 2013
eslamp 248
EslamP248
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EslamP248,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/15/2013 | 10:38:29 PM
re: Anonymous: 10 Things We've Learned In 2013
top covere pix
EslamP248
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EslamP248,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/15/2013 | 10:38:11 PM
re: Anonymous: 10 Things We've Learned In 2013
my friends
EslamP248
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EslamP248,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/15/2013 | 10:36:39 PM
re: Anonymous: 10 Things We've Learned In 2013
eslampop785
EslamP248
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EslamP248,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/15/2013 | 10:36:30 PM
re: Anonymous: 10 Things We've Learned In 2013
eslampop
EslamP248
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EslamP248,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/15/2013 | 10:14:14 PM
re: Anonymous: 10 Things We've Learned In 2013
facebook
majenkins
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majenkins,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/24/2013 | 5:10:14 PM
re: Anonymous: 10 Things We've Learned In 2013
Revenge yes, justice only their own eyes, and reform only to remake the world to comform their ideas.
PJS880
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PJS880,
User Rank: Ninja
3/14/2013 | 11:12:35 PM
re: Anonymous: 10 Things We've Learned In 2013
Great article but I have to agree with Leo, I dislike reading these articles for that reason alone. All though the topics are of interest, I donGt have the patience. I also have to disagree with Jonathan on his views on people and their awareness about their online security. I believe because of all the attacks and breeches and the general publicGs knowledge is constantly increasing, which was the exact opposite in the past.

Paul Sprague
InformationWeek Contributor
Jonathan_Camhi
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Jonathan_Camhi,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/5/2013 | 9:47:33 PM
re: Anonymous: 10 Things We've Learned In 2013
I hadn't heard of this Rustle League incident before. Hackers hacking hackers. I wonder if all of the news surrounding hacking and cybercrime lately could put a big enough dent in people's trust in the internet to actually change people's behavior. Will people start taking their individual online security more seriously? Personally, I doubt it. I feel like we have already developed a sort of blind trust in the internet because it makes our lives so convenient that we don't even want to consider what would happen if our online credentials were compromised.
Leo Regulus
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Leo Regulus,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/3/2013 | 8:54:42 PM
re: Anonymous: 10 Things We've Learned In 2013
Information Week only had one important New Year's Resolution this year. '"No Slide Show Articles with out a prominent 'View-as-one-page' link." How's that working out for you so far?
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