Vulnerabilities / Threats
8/17/2016
04:00 PM
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8 Surprising Statistics About Insider Threats

Insider theft and negligence is real--and so are the practices that amplify the risks.
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Image Source: Adobe Stock

Image Source: Adobe Stock

Even though insider threat events are typically much more infrequent than external attacks, they usually pose a much higher severity of risk for organizations when they do happen. Whether malicious or simply negligent, insiders need access to sensitive intellectual property and systems to do their jobs. As a result, when they break policy accidentally or choose to steal, their actions stand to do a tremendous amount of damage to a business. Here's how recent surveys and statistics measure perceptions about the risk posed by insider threats, along with some of the common shortfalls in IT security that unnecessarily expose organizations to higher insider risks.

 

Ericka Chickowski specializes in coverage of information technology and business innovation. She has focused on information security for the better part of a decade and regularly writes about the security industry as a contributor to Dark Reading.  View Full Bio

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DLJ@HPE
A simple step to reduce the threat
Insider threats are much harder to detect and potentially much more damaging financially and reputationally than an external attack. Secure content management, which employs technology assisted capabilties to constantly scan, analyze and act to reduce the risk needs to be an essential part of every organizations data protection strategy.
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