Threat Intelligence
1/30/2017
03:30 PM
Steve Zurier
Steve Zurier
Slideshows
Connect Directly
Twitter
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%

6 Free Ransomware Decryption Tools

The No More Ransom group has been working to get free decryptor tools into the hands of security professionals and the general public.
Previous
1 of 7
Next

Image Source: Flickr

Image Source: Flickr

Worried about getting hit with ransomware? You're not alone. The good news is that security experts and law enforcement have been working to combat ransomware: over the past year, the No More Ransom project has developed free decryptor tools for more than two dozen strains of ransomware. 

Jornt van der Wiel, a Kaspersky Lab security researcher, notes that No More Ransom was launched in July 2016 by the Dutch National Police, Europol, Kaspersky Lab, and Intel Security.

From those early meetings, No More Ransom started releasing the first batch of free decryptor tools. In December, Bitdefender, Emsisoft, Check Point, and Trend Micro joined the project as associate partners.

"We have definitely angered the ransomware makers," says Intel Security Vice President and CTO Raj Samani. "Recently, we found a ransomware variant using the file extension .nomoreransom, so they know who we are."

The No More Ransom site is managed by Amazon Web Services and Barracuda. For more information and access to the full range of free decryptor tools, check out No More Ransom.

Here's a look at the free tools available to get back your data after a ransomware attack as welll as in inside look at how they were created, based on interviews with vand der Wiel and Samani.

 

 

Steve Zurier has more than 30 years of journalism and publishing experience, most of the last 24 of which were spent covering networking and security technology. Steve is based in Columbia, Md. View Full Bio

Previous
1 of 7
Next
Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon Contest
Write a Caption, Win a Starbucks Card! Click Here
Latest Comment: This comment is waiting for review by our moderators.
Current Issue
5 Security Technologies to Watch in 2017
Emerging tools and services promise to make a difference this year. Are they on your company's list?
Flash Poll
New Best Practices for Secure App Development
New Best Practices for Secure App Development
The transition from DevOps to SecDevOps is combining with the move toward cloud computing to create new challenges - and new opportunities - for the information security team. Download this report, to learn about the new best practices for secure application development.
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2013-7445
Published: 2015-10-15
The Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) subsystem in the Linux kernel through 4.x mishandles requests for Graphics Execution Manager (GEM) objects, which allows context-dependent attackers to cause a denial of service (memory consumption) via an application that processes graphics data, as demonstrated b...

CVE-2015-4948
Published: 2015-10-15
netstat in IBM AIX 5.3, 6.1, and 7.1 and VIOS 2.2.x, when a fibre channel adapter is used, allows local users to gain privileges via unspecified vectors.

CVE-2015-5660
Published: 2015-10-15
Cross-site request forgery (CSRF) vulnerability in eXtplorer before 2.1.8 allows remote attackers to hijack the authentication of arbitrary users for requests that execute PHP code.

CVE-2015-6003
Published: 2015-10-15
Directory traversal vulnerability in QNAP QTS before 4.1.4 build 0910 and 4.2.x before 4.2.0 RC2 build 0910, when AFP is enabled, allows remote attackers to read or write to arbitrary files by leveraging access to an OS X (1) user or (2) guest account.

CVE-2015-6333
Published: 2015-10-15
Cisco Application Policy Infrastructure Controller (APIC) 1.1j allows local users to gain privileges via vectors involving addition of an SSH key, aka Bug ID CSCuw46076.

Dark Reading Radio
Archived Dark Reading Radio
In past years, security researchers have discovered ways to hack cars, medical devices, automated teller machines, and many other targets. Dark Reading Executive Editor Kelly Jackson Higgins hosts researcher Samy Kamkar and Levi Gundert, vice president of threat intelligence at Recorded Future, to discuss some of 2016's most unusual and creative hacks by white hats, and what these new vulnerabilities might mean for the coming year.