Threat Intelligence

2/23/2018
12:00 PM
Kelly Sheridan
Kelly Sheridan
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10 Can't-Miss Talks at Black Hat Asia

With threats featuring everything from nation-states to sleep states, the sessions taking place from March 20-23 in Singapore are relevant to security experts around the world.
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(Image: Black Hat)

(Image: Black Hat)

Mobile and platform security are popular topics for next month's Black Hat Asia conference in Singapore, where industry experts will meet from March 20-23 to learn about newly discovered exploits and the tools and techniques to defend against them.

Lidia Giuliano, independent security professional and member of the Black Hat Asia Regional Review Board, notes she was impressed by the diversity of this year's submissions. Session topics cover mobile, cryptography, IoT, exploit development, malware, policy, network defense, data forensics and incident response, reverse engineering, Web application security, the security development lifecycle, hardware, and platform security, among others.

Much of this year's research will dig into mobile threats, particularly on the Android operating system. "People have their whole lives on their mobile phones," Giuliano explains. "It's a window into their lives and that puts people in a really vulnerable position."

Here, we put the spotlight on Black Hat Asia talks that are expected to deliver groundbreaking and useful information for security pros. If you're planning to attend, dig out your schedules and let us know what you're excited to see.

 

 

 

 

Black Hat Asia returns to Singapore with hands-on technical Trainings, cutting-edge Briefings, Arsenal open-source tool demonstrations, top-tier solutions and service providers in the Business Hall. Click for information on the conference and to register.

 

Kelly Sheridan is the Staff Editor at Dark Reading, where she focuses on cybersecurity news and analysis. She is a business technology journalist who previously reported for InformationWeek, where she covered Microsoft, and Insurance & Technology, where she covered financial ... View Full Bio

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