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12/9/2015
01:50 PM
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The Employee Password Habits That Could Hurt Enterprises

While education and efforts around online credentials are improving, password hygiene still has problems
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The lines drawn between personal digital space and work digital space are all but disintegrated as the traditional 40-hour work week in a confined office dissolves away in this gig economy. This makes life difficult when it comes to accessing and securing data. A survey out recently by Ping Identity shows how even though companies my have good credential policies in place, and employees are made aware of security, their password safety still lags. Here's a look at some of the relevant stats. 

 

Ericka Chickowski specializes in coverage of information technology and business innovation. She has focused on information security for the better part of a decade and regularly writes about the security industry as a contributor to Dark Reading.  View Full Bio

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Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
12/20/2015 | 4:52:52 PM
Recipe for disaster
The password-changing policy is possibly the worst.  It makes no account for employees who actually have strong passwords and also fails to take into account actual risk.  That's how you get simple-to-guess/hack passwords.
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
12/20/2015 | 4:51:34 PM
Re: Nice compliation of bad habits and statistics
Not to mention family members and friends who may become aware of their loved ones' passwords in other ways.

I once went on a date with someone who told me that because of her company's onerous password-changing requirements, she always just did a minor variation of the same (easy-to-guess) word.
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
12/20/2015 | 4:49:50 PM
Re: We're all guilty
This is exactly why many security experts today advise what was once taboo advice -- that people write down their passwords, specifically to allow for greater complexity and entropy.  Better you write down your password and keep it in a secure place (for instance, not on a sticky note on your computer monitor) and it be super hard to remember than have an easy to remember (and easy to guess/hack) password that you don't write down.
RyonKnight
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RyonKnight,
User Rank: Strategist
12/16/2015 | 3:29:56 AM
All on one page please
Article on one page please.  I'd like to read it but I'm not clicking through 10 pages.
BarbaraJohnson
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BarbaraJohnson,
User Rank: Author
12/12/2015 | 7:22:21 PM
Nice compliation of bad habits and statistics
I especially like "*54% of employees share login information with family members so they can access their computers, smartphones and tablets" It's a good specific point to add into user awareness material.
Whoopty
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Whoopty,
User Rank: Ninja
12/10/2015 | 7:34:49 AM
We're all guilty
I bet we're all guilty of something on this list, even those who are pretty good with password security. They're endlessly annoying though. You have to remember them, yet make them complicated and change them regularly. It's such a headache. 

The amount of services we all use now too, there's no way to remember everything. But then do you change your password storage login often? If you forget that, the pain-in-the-neck of having to reset everything is ridiculous.
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