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Wave Systems Introduces Scrambls For Enterprise; Technology Protects Data Posted On Social Networks

Scrambls protects data that is often overlooked in corporate security initiatives

Lee, MA--December 4, 2012 – Scrambls for Enterprise launched today, giving organizations a means for their employees to safely collaborate over social media sites like TwitterÒ and Facebook, and share files with cloud services like DropboxÔ and Salesforce.comÒ. Scrambls protects data that is often overlooked in corporate security initiatives – information shared online via social media, files stored in the cloud and data in motion.

Employees are free to leverage existing social media infrastructures to enter status updates, Tweets, blog posts, files and more, without jeopardizing security or privacy. Scrambls for Enterprise encrypts data before it ever leaves a user's computer or smartphone. Posts and files can only be viewed by those the enterprise grants permission to--everyone else sees scrambled text.

"Social media and cloud services are expanding the way business is done, but enterprises need greater control of the information they share across the public web," commented Steven Sprague, scrambls co-creator and CEO of Wave Systems. "These services are often self-discovered by employees who use them to share critical information. Enterprises need to take responsibility for this new flow of data, and scrambls provides the privacy, security and audit controls similar to what you'd see with corporate email accounts."

The power of scrambls lies in the permissions granted to group members. To read a post or descramble a file, the service automatically applies the permission to make it readable again for only those individuals granted access. Business administrators set the policy and manage the groups. Add or remove people from the groups at any time to change who can read messages and files, even after they've been published on the web.

"Scrambls can open up new business opportunities with use cases for every type of vertical market," continued Sprague. "In healthcare, a private and protected channel for communication leads to better care and service. It's easy for doctors, social workers and caregivers to have sensitive discussions about the care of a family member in real time using popular tools like Twitter or Facebook. Those conversations remain private with scrambls."

Deploying scrambls in the Enterprise

The scrambls enterprise console gives employees, managers and IT staff the ability to manage accounts. You first create groups for access either by email addresses or through the existing corporate lists that enterprises already use (Active Directory, corporate email domains, etc.). Add more detailed rules as needed, like an expiration date for a file, or a password that can be used to view a blog post. Deploy the client install or have users download it, and they're ready to scramble. It's as simple as that!Scrambls privacy and security can be added to an organization's internal applications as well through a software developer kit. The SDK enables third-party apps and sites to integrate directly with scrambls to leverage the same groups for security, privacy and control.

Scrambls for Enterprise is available with special trial and introductory pricing for a limited time. Contact sales@scrambls.com for more information on securing social media and cloud services in your organization. A free consumer download is also available at www.scrambls.com.

About Scrambls

Scrambls is a Cloud security and privacy service developed by Wave Systems Corp. (NASDAQ: WAVX) that makes online sharing simple and safe. All you need is the scrambls plug-in added to your browser toolbar, or a scrambls-enabled application. Scrambls lets you decide what the privacy policy will be for each communication that you share. Scrambls makes Cloud sharing smarter, with security and control over what you are sharing and with whom you are sharing it.

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