Risk
8/29/2013
05:33 PM
Dark Reading
Dark Reading
Products and Releases
Connect Directly
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%

Social Networks: Can Robots Violate User Privacy?

High-Tech Bridge experimented to verify how the 50 largest social networks, Web services, and free emails systems respect – or abuse - privacy of their users

Recent news in the international media has revealed numerous Internet privacy concerns that definitely deserve attention and further investigation. This is why we, at High-Tech Bridge, decided to conduct a simple technical experiment to verify how the 50 largest social networks, web services and free emails systems respect – or indeed abuse - the privacy of their users. The experiment and its results can be reproduced by anyone, as we tried to be as neutral and objective as possible.

The nature of the experiment was quite simple: we deployed a dedicated web server and created secret and totally unpredictable URLs on it for each tested service, something similar to:

http://www.our-domain-for-test.com/secret/18354832319/sgheAsZaLq/

Then we used various legitimate functionalities (detailed in the table below) of the tested services to transmit the secret URLs, carefully monitoring our web server logs for all incoming HTTP requests (to see which services followed the secret link that was not supposed to be known and accessed by anyone).

During the 10 days of our experiment, we trapped only six services out of the 50. However, among those six were four of the biggest and most used social networks: Facebook, Twitter, Google+ and Formspring. The remaining two were URL shortening services: bit.ly and goo.gl.

If for the URL shortening services such behavior may be part of their legitimate functionalities, it should not also be the case with social networks such as Facebook and Twitter. Taking into consideration that some of the services may have legitimate robots (e.g. to verify and block spam links) crawling every user-transmitted link automatically, we also created a robots.txt file on our web server that restricted bots accessing the server and its content. Only Twitter respected this restriction, all other social networks simply ignored it, accessing the secret URL.

Below, you can find HTTP requests of trapped services that accessed the secret URLs:

Bit.ly: IP: 50.17.69.56 User-Agent: bitlybot

Facebook: IP: 173.252.112.114 User-Agent: facebookexternalhit/1.1 (+http://www.facebook.com/externalhit_uatext.php)

Formspring: IP: 54.226.58.107 User-Agent: Mozilla/5.0 (Windows NT 6.2; WOW64) AppleWebKit/537.31 (KHTML, like Gecko) Chrome/26.0.1410.64 Safari/537.31

goo.gl: IP: 66.249.81.112 User-Agent: Mozilla/5.0 (X11; Linux x86_64) AppleWebKit/537.4 (KHTML, like Gecko; Google Web Preview) Chrome/22.0.1229 Safari/537.4

Google+: IP: 66.249.81.112 User-Agent: Mozilla/5.0 (Windows NT 6.1; rv:6.0) Gecko/20110814 Firefox/6.0 Google (+https://developers.google.com/+/web/snippet/)

Twitter: IP: 199.59.148.211 User-Agent: Twitterbot/1.0

Marsel Nizamutdinov, Chief Research Officer at High-Tech Bridge, comments: "The results of this experiment are quite interesting actually. The four trapped social networks justify their activities by “automated verifications”. However, it is technically impossible to verify what is really going on and how the information obtained on the user-transmitted URLs is being used. Today, quite a lot of web applications omit authentication and rely on temporary or unpredictable URLs to hide some content and, when users transfer such URLs via social networks, they cannot be sure that their information will indeed remain confidential. Unfortunately there is no way to keep the URL and its content confidential [if there is no authentication of course] while transferring the URL via social networks."

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Cartoon
Current Issue
Dark Reading, September 16, 2014
Malicious software is morphing to be more targeted, stealthy, and destructive. Are you prepared to stop it?
Flash Poll
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2012-1032
Published: 2014-09-17
Cross-site scripting (XSS) vulnerability in the Euroling SiteSeeker module 3.x before 3.4.5 for EPiServer allows remote attackers to inject arbitrary web script or HTML via unspecified vectors. NOTE: the provenance of this information is unknown; the details are obtained solely from third party inf...

CVE-2012-1417
Published: 2014-09-17
Multiple cross-site scripting (XSS) vulnerabilities in Local Phone book and Blacklist form in Yealink VOIP Phones allow remote authenticated users to inject arbitrary web script or HTML via the user field to cgi-bin/ConfigManApp.com.

CVE-2012-1506
Published: 2014-09-17
SQL injection vulnerability in the updateStatus function in lib/models/benefits/Hsp.php in OrangeHRM before 2.7 allows remote authenticated users to execute arbitrary SQL commands via the hspSummaryId parameter to plugins/ajaxCalls/haltResumeHsp.php. NOTE: some of these details are obtained from th...

CVE-2012-1507
Published: 2014-09-17
Multiple cross-site scripting (XSS) vulnerabilities in OrangeHRM before 2.7 allow remote attackers to inject arbitrary web script or HTML via the (1) newHspStatus parameter to plugins/ajaxCalls/haltResumeHsp.php, (2) sortOrder1 parameter to templates/hrfunct/emppop.php, or (3) uri parameter to index...

CVE-2012-2583
Published: 2014-09-17
Cross-site scripting (XSS) vulnerability in Mini Mail Dashboard Widget plugin 1.42 for WordPress allows remote attackers to inject arbitrary web script or HTML via the body of an email.

Best of the Web
Dark Reading Radio