Risk
12/17/2012
07:04 AM
Dark Reading
Dark Reading
Quick Hits
50%
50%

Application Monitoring For Security Professionals

Keeping an eye on applications can help your organization avoid data breaches. Here are some tips on how to do it right

[The following is excerpted from "Application Monitoring For Security Professionals," a new, free report posted this week on Dark Reading's Security Monitoring Tech Center.]

Every IT professional worth his or her salt knows that, when it comes to information security, monitoring is tremendously important.

IT pros in regulated environments know the importance placed on monitoring controls from a compliance standpoint, but even when compliance isn't a factor, monitoring controls are often a key mechanism for determining when a security event is in progress in an environment -- and a key mechanism for analyzing root cause after the fact.

However, despite the importance of monitoring, most organizations have a significant blind spot in their monitoring capabilities. And this blind spot appears at the highest level of the stack: the application layer.

But this doesn’t have to be the case. For the practical-minded security professional, there can be tremendous value in expanding monitoring capabilities to include the application space. In fact, in many cases, you can leverage monitoring tool investments you’ve already made to help expand visibility and derive additional value for application-level security events.

Oftentimes, technology professionals associate monitoring only with logging. But it’s important to recognize that logging is only one of a few different vehicles available for gaining information about applications in the environment.

Monitoring can include any number of other controls over and above logs. Any control, process, metadata, or other information that informs security personnel about the security health of an application is a potential data point to target as part of your monitoring strategy.

There are as many methodologies for security logging as there are applications themselves. This matters because it has a direct impact on your ability to use stock tools to collect log information. Many organizations with log management tools in place will want to leverage existing investments for their applications.

To read more about the tools that can be used to do application security monitoring -- and some steps for implementing them -- download the free report on application monitoring and security.

Have a comment on this story? Please click "Add a Comment" below. If you'd like to contact Dark Reading's editors directly, send us a message.

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Cartoon
Current Issue
Flash Poll
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2014-4774
Published: 2015-05-25
Cross-site request forgery (CSRF) vulnerability in the login page in IBM License Metric Tool 9 before 9.1.0.2 and Endpoint Manager for Software Use Analysis 9 before 9.1.0.2 allows remote attackers to hijack the authentication of arbitrary users via vectors involving a FRAME element.

CVE-2014-4778
Published: 2015-05-25
IBM License Metric Tool 9 before 9.1.0.2 and Endpoint Manager for Software Use Analysis 9 before 9.1.0.2 do not send an X-Frame-Options HTTP header in response to requests for the login page, which allows remote attackers to conduct clickjacking attacks via vectors involving a FRAME element.

CVE-2014-6190
Published: 2015-05-25
The log viewer in IBM Workload Deployer 3.1 before 3.1.0.7 allows remote attackers to obtain sensitive information via a direct request for the URL of a log document.

CVE-2014-6192
Published: 2015-05-25
Cross-site scripting (XSS) vulnerability in IBM Curam Social Program Management 6.0 SP2 before EP26, 6.0.4 before 6.0.4.5 iFix10, 6.0.5 before 6.0.5.6, and 6.0.5.5a before 6.0.5.8 allows remote authenticated users to inject arbitrary web script or HTML via a crafted URL.

CVE-2014-8926
Published: 2015-05-25
Common Inventory Technology (CIT) before 2.7.0.2050 in IBM License Metric Tool 7.2.2, 7.5, and 9; Endpoint Manger for Software Use Analysis 9; and Tivoli Asset Discovery for Distributed 7.2.2 and 7.5 allows remote attackers to cause a denial of service (CPU consumption or application crash) via a cr...

Dark Reading Radio
Archived Dark Reading Radio
Join security and risk expert John Pironti and Dark Reading Editor-in-Chief Tim Wilson for a live online discussion of the sea-changing shift in security strategy and the many ways it is affecting IT and business.