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4 In 5 Travelers Fear Mobile Use Of Unsecured Public Wi-Fi Exposes Personal Data To Cyberthreats

Smartphones increase traveler Wi-Fi use by 200 percent in some unsecure public venues, yet 84 percent are not actively protecting their information

MOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif. (Nov. 18, 2013) – A striking number of U.S. travelers, while aware of the risks, are not taking the necessary steps to protect themselves on public Wi-Fi and are exposing their data and personal information to cyber criminals and hackers, according to research released today by AnchorFree, the global leader in consumer security, privacy and Internet freedom.

The PhoCusWright Traveler Technology Survey 2013 polled 2,200 U.S. travelers over the age of 18 revealing new insights into travelers' online behavior and their understanding of cyber risks.

It is estimated that 89% of Wi-Fi hotspots globally are not secure. The increased use of smartphones and tablets to access unsecured public Wi-Fi hotspots has dramatically increased the risk of threats. Travelers were three times more likely to use a smartphone or tablet than a laptop to access an unsecured hotspot in a shopping mall or tourist attraction, two times more likely in a restaurant or coffee shop and one and a half times more likely at the airport.

"In the age of tablets, smartphones and ubiquitous hotspots, many travelers don't realize that they are unsuspectingly sharing sensitive information with others on public Wi-Fi," said David Gorodyansky, founder and CEO of AnchorFree, makers of Hotspot Shield VPN. "It's troubling that while most travelers are concerned about online hacking, very few know how, or care enough, to protect themselves. Looming threats -- from cyber thieves to malware and snoopers -- are skyrocketing on public Wi-Fi and travelers need to be vigilant in protecting themselves."

Further to this point, a striking 82% of travelers surveyed reported that they suspect their personal information is not safe while browsing on public Wi-Fi, yet nearly 84% of travelers do not take the necessary precautions to protect themselves online. The top three concerns cited when using public Wi-Fi are the possibility of someone stealing personal information when engaging in banking or financial sites (51 percent), making online purchases that require a credit or debit card (51 percent) and making purchases using an account that has payment information stored (45 percent). Travelers were less concerned about using email or messaging services on public Wi-Fi (18 percent).

"Consumers underestimate their exposure to risks when connecting to public Wi-Fi," said Robert Siciliano, personal security and identity theft expert. "While credit card fraud is considered a traveler's most significant risk, consumers should be aware that there are many levels to protecting personal data online – a compromised email account puts other accounts at risk, including credit cards, and provides hackers with a wealth of information they can use to steal your identity."

Cyber-security threats are not the only issues people face while traveling. Thirty-seven percent of international travelers --which equates to 10 million U.S. travelers annually-- encountered blocked, censored or filtered content including social networks (40 percent) such as Facebook, Twitter and Instagram during their trip. Top websites that were also blocked include video and music websites such as Hulu and YouTube (37 percent), streaming services such as Pandora and Spotify (35 percent), email (30 percent) as well as messaging sites such as Skype and Viber (27 percent).

To avoid the threat of hacking and cyber attacks, more than half of travelers (54 percent) try not to engage in online activities that involve personally sensitive information while one in five (22 percent) avoid using public Wi-Fi altogether because they believe their personal information is at risk. Only 16% reported using a VPN such as Hotspot Shield.

About Hotspot Shield

AnchorFree's award-winning Hotspot Shield VPN, the most trusted VPN service with 150 million downloads, encrypts all Internet communications and prevents hackers from stealing sensitive data while using unsecure Wi-Fi networks. In addition to secure and private browsing, Hotspot Shield VPN provides access to all local Internet content while travelling abroad. Users can increase productivity and remove any browsing limits and stream data freely with the ability to access VPNs on U.S., U.K. or other servers from anywhere in the world.

For a free download of Hotspot Shield, visit: www.hotspotshield.com. Hotspot Shield is available for PC, Mac, iOS and Android. An infographic with survey results is available upon request.

Survey Methodology

The data points referenced above come from a study commissioned by AnchorFree, fielded by PhoCusWright through Global Market Insite, Inc. and conducted as an online survey among a total of 2,203 U.S. travelers. To qualify for participation in the study, respondents were required to:

Have taken at least one leisure trip at least 75 miles from home in the past 12 months that included paid lodging and/or air travel

Have used the Internet to select a destination, compare and choose leisure travel products, book travel or share travel experiences in the past 12 months

Have played an active role in planning their leisure trips in the past 12 months

The error interval for analysis is +/-2.1 percent at a 95% confidence level. Complete results of the survey can be viewed at blog.hotspotshield.com.

About AnchorFree

AnchorFree's mission is to provide secure browsing, privacy and freedom to the more than 1.6 billion people around the world who are in need of a secure browsing solution or freedom to access internet content. AnchorFree does this through Hotspot Shield, the world's most popular privacy, security and Web access tool. Hotspot Shield ensures safe, private Web browsing and disrupts censorship of commonly blocked content such as breaking news, social networking and search engines. Hotspot Shield is available for PC, Mac, Apple iOS and Android platforms at www.AnchorFree.com. AnchorFree is a privately held, venture-backed company based in Mountain View, Calif.

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