Risk
12/14/2012
02:04 PM
John Foley
John Foley
Slideshows
Connect Directly
LinkedIn
Twitter
Google+
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%

Military Drones Present And Future: Visual Tour

The Pentagon's growing fleet of unmanned aerial vehicles ranges from hand-launched machines to the Air Force's experimental X-37B space plane.
Previous
9 of 22
Next


Boeing's liquid-hydrogen powered Phantom Eye completed its first test flight in June 2012 at Edwards Air Force Base in California. With its 150-foot wingspan, the UAV climbed to just over 4,000 feet at a speed of 62 knots. Phantom Eye's environmentally friendly propulsion system (its "exhaust" is water) will let it stay aloft 10 miles high for up to four days. But watch out below: Upon landing, the vehicle's landing gear dug into the lake bed and was damaged.

Image credit: Boeing

RECOMMENDED READING:

Drones To Fly U.S. Skies, In DOD Plans

Military Transformers: 20 Innovative Defense Technologies

Spy Tech: 10 CIA-Backed Investments

14 Amazing DARPA Technologies On Tap

Air Force Drone Controllers Embrace Linux, But Why?

Secret Spy Satellite Takes Off: Stunning Images

5 Items Should Top Obama's Technology Agenda

U.S. Military Robots Of The Future: Visual Tour

Iran Hacked GPS Signals To Capture U.S. Drone

Previous
9 of 22
Next
Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
jc
50%
50%
jc,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/3/2013 | 6:42:33 PM
re: Military Drones Present And Future: Visual Tour
Phantom Ray looks exactly like a 1950s cartoon of a UFO. Perhaps they've been test flying these things prior to last year!
D. Henschen
50%
50%
D. Henschen,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/3/2013 | 3:55:35 PM
re: Military Drones Present And Future: Visual Tour
It might alarm you to learn that the use of surveillance drones has been authorized by executive order over U.S. skies. It's all part of the post-9/11, police-state mentality that gave rise to the Patriot Act and other tramplings upon personal freedoms and privacy that could easily be abused...
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Cartoon
Current Issue
Flash Poll
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2015-0986
Published: 2015-05-26
Multiple stack-based buffer overflows in Moxa VPort ActiveX SDK Plus before 2.8 allow remote attackers to insert assembly-code lines via vectors involving a regkey (1) set or (2) get command.

CVE-2015-3808
Published: 2015-05-26
The dissect_lbmr_pser function in epan/dissectors/packet-lbmr.c in the LBMR dissector in Wireshark 1.12.x before 1.12.5 does not reject a zero length, which allows remote attackers to cause a denial of service (infinite loop) via a crafted packet.

CVE-2015-3809
Published: 2015-05-26
The dissect_lbmr_pser function in epan/dissectors/packet-lbmr.c in the LBMR dissector in Wireshark 1.12.x before 1.12.5 does not properly track the current offset, which allows remote attackers to cause a denial of service (infinite loop) via a crafted packet.

CVE-2015-3810
Published: 2015-05-26
epan/dissectors/packet-websocket.c in the WebSocket dissector in Wireshark 1.12.x before 1.12.5 uses a recursive algorithm, which allows remote attackers to cause a denial of service (CPU consumption) via a crafted packet.

CVE-2015-3811
Published: 2015-05-26
epan/dissectors/packet-wcp.c in the WCP dissector in Wireshark 1.10.x before 1.10.14 and 1.12.x before 1.12.5 improperly refers to previously processed bytes, which allows remote attackers to cause a denial of service (application crash) via a crafted packet, a different vulnerability than CVE-2015-...

Dark Reading Radio
Archived Dark Reading Radio
Join security and risk expert John Pironti and Dark Reading Editor-in-Chief Tim Wilson for a live online discussion of the sea-changing shift in security strategy and the many ways it is affecting IT and business.