Risk
1/15/2013
05:29 PM
Connect Directly
LinkedIn
Twitter
Google+
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%

Meet Facebook's Graph Search Tool

Facebook downplays Google as competitor as it launches "internal" search tool that helps you find people, photos, places and interests inside Facebook using established privacy settings.

Zuckerberg emphasized that Graph Search is not Web search, Google's primary business. Web search, he said, is designed to take any open-ended query and return links. Graph Search, he said, is designed to take a precise query and return an answer. He neglected to mention that Google has been focused on services that provide specific answers, such as Google Now.

Although Graph Search isn't a direct competitor to Google Search, it represents a competitive threat nonetheless. It makes Facebook more useful to users, who might then be less likely to look beyond Facebook for information. It also challenges Google by expanding Facebook's relationship with Microsoft Bing, which will be providing Web search results to queries submitted through Facebook when Facebook doesn't have an answer.

When Zuckerberg was asked whether Google had been considered as a partner, the reporters and Facebook employees in the room -- steeped in the history of antagonism between the two companies -- chuckled.

Zuckerberg smiled and declared, "I would love to work with Google. When we did our Bing Web search integration, we were very public about the fact that this wasn't a thing we were trying to do with Bing. We wanted to make search social in general." He said that given the social APIs Facebook has built, it would be easy to work with a company like Google "as long as the company is willing to honor the privacy of the folks who are sharing the content on Facebook. And we haven't been able to work that out yet."

A follow-up question about Google's lack of suitability as a partner prompted Zuckerberg to elaborate. "When people share something on Facebook, we want to give people the ability to broadcast something out, but also be able to change their privacy settings later and take content down," he said, suggesting that the way Google handles information doesn't allow for the prompt removal of content at the direction of users. That kind of infrastructure, he said, "takes a lot of commitment from the partner." And he stressed, "Microsoft was more willing to do things that were specific to Facebook." (Google does offer the ability to remove content from YouTube, though that's for the benefit of copyright holders.)

Although Zuckerberg did his best to downplay Facebook's competition with Google, there was no hiding the fact that one of the two Facebook employees assisting Zuckerberg in the product introduction was Lars Rasmussen, who helped create Google Maps and left Google shortly after the failure of Google Wave.

Graph Search remains a work in progress and Zuckerberg said it would keep Facebook engineers busy for years to come as further improvements are implemented. At the moment, it is focused on queries related to people, photos, places, and interests: for example, "people who like tennis and live nearby," "photos of my friends taken in New York," "Indian restaurants liked by my friends from India," and "books read by CEOs."

Eventually, Graph Search will be expanded to cover mobile, languages, posts and Open Graph data. Graph Search might also get an API at some point, to enable third-party developers to create apps capable of accessing Graph Search data.

"This is one of the coolest things we've done in a while," said Zuckerberg.

Previous
2 of 2
Next
Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
Melanie Rodier
50%
50%
Melanie Rodier,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/17/2013 | 9:11:26 PM
re: Meet Facebook's Graph Search Tool
"Tom Stocky, director of product management at Facebook, suggested that Graph Search could be useful for recruiting." I would think that LinkedIn is still going to be much more useful for this. I don't know how many people actually list their job experience on Facebook, whereas that's a large part of what Linkedin is for...I'm sure Facebook would like to compete in that space too, but it seems a bit of a stretch. At least for now.
Verdumont Monte
50%
50%
Verdumont Monte,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/16/2013 | 9:54:23 PM
re: Meet Facebook's Graph Search Tool
One interesting fact - Right now this search is not working as intended.. For example, if I try to locate my friends in the town I live in, this search is returning people who has clearly mentioned other town in their info. Query I used is "My friends who live in <cityname>" I guess it might look into their history (may be they had lived in my town a long back) and return the results..</cityname>
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Flash Poll
Current Issue
Cartoon
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2013-6117
Published: 2014-07-11
Dahua DVR 2.608.0000.0 and 2.608.GV00.0 allows remote attackers to bypass authentication and obtain sensitive information including user credentials, change user passwords, clear log files, and perform other actions via a request to TCP port 37777.

CVE-2014-0174
Published: 2014-07-11
Cumin (aka MRG Management Console), as used in Red Hat Enterprise MRG 2.5, does not include the HTTPOnly flag in a Set-Cookie header for the session cookie, which makes it easier for remote attackers to obtain potentially sensitive information via script access to this cookie.

CVE-2014-3485
Published: 2014-07-11
The REST API in the ovirt-engine in oVirt, as used in Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization (rhevm) 3.4, allows remote authenticated users to read arbitrary files and have other unspecified impact via unknown vectors, related to an XML External Entity (XXE) issue.

CVE-2014-3499
Published: 2014-07-11
Docker 1.0.0 uses world-readable and world-writable permissions on the management socket, which allows local users to gain privileges via unspecified vectors.

CVE-2014-3503
Published: 2014-07-11
Apache Syncope 1.1.x before 1.1.8 uses weak random values to generate passwords, which makes it easier for remote attackers to guess the password via a brute force attack.

Best of the Web
Dark Reading Radio
Archived Dark Reading Radio
Marilyn Cohodas and her guests look at the evolving nature of the relationship between CIO and CSO.