Risk

1/28/2008
11:33 AM
Tom LaSusa
Tom LaSusa
Commentary
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Happy Data Privacy Day!

We're less than a week away from finding out whether Punxsutawney Phil predicts six more weeks of winter. While we wait for him to make his annual weather forecast, we've got time to squeeze in another holiday. You may not be as familiar with this one -- there's no parades, gift-giving or time off from work. Frankly, it's a shame we have to acknowledge it at all. But it's a testament of the kind of world we live in. Today is Data Privacy Day.

We're less than a week away from finding out whether Punxsutawney Phil predicts six more weeks of winter. While we wait for him to make his annual weather forecast, we've got time to squeeze in another holiday. You may not be as familiar with this one -- there's no parades, gift-giving or time off from work. Frankly, it's a shame we have to acknowledge it at all. But it's a testament of the kind of world we live in. Today is Data Privacy Day.Don't feel bad if it doesn't ring a bell -- you didn't miss the greeting cards between the Valentines and St. Patrick's Day cards. First observed last year in Europe, the event was designed to encourage IT professionals and regular folks alike to become more aware of data protection and what can done to protect it. This year, the United States and Canada have joined 27 European countries to acknowledge the day. All are encouraged to spend some time today (and during the next few days) thinking about data security -- both on a personal and professional level.

Google appears to have taken the lead charge on the celebrations by participating in an international data privacy conference at Duke University in North Carolina. In addition, the company has co-sponsored the creation of educational materials on teen online privacy for parents and educators and offering it to schools country-wide. There's videos to watch on YouTube and privacy booklets being offered. Microsoft, IBM, and others are participating as well, trying to get the word out on how seriously we should be taking data privacy issues.

This is a great idea, but like I said earlier -- it's tragic that we even have to create and recognize a day like this at all. Considering, though, how badly (and I mean God-awful badly) various companies and government branches handled and protected data last year -- it seems like every day should be Data Privacy Day. Every day we should do one thing to remind us that someone is out there, waiting for the right opportunity to steal customer information. Every day one of our co-workers absent-mindedly puts his or her laptop bad down at an airport and walks away. But if it takes an officially recognized day to encourage everyone to try just a little bit harder to be more diligent, then I'll be the first one to pitch some greeting card ideas to Hallmark.

Roses are Red, Violets are Blue, I encrypted all my files, Did You?

Tell us how you could commit to celebrating Data Privacy Day today. It doesn't matter how big or small. Maybe you'll talk to an aging parent about being more careful with giving out their personal information. How about a quick meeting with your staff on security protocols (locking laptops, password protection, etc).

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