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1/26/2012
06:34 PM
Thomas Claburn
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Google Study: Social Media Enhances Privacy

Sharing can shape your reputation, thereby building trust and privacy, Google research says. "Clean coal," meet "privacy-aware sharing." Let the oxymoron wars begin.

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Yet, Staddon counters that social media "also leads to huge privacy advantages by facilitating perception, both in terms of understanding of one's online self, particularly as driven by the inputs of others, and self-representation."

Are the benefits of social media huge enough to outweigh the chance of, say, losing custody of one's kids due to some ill-considered Facebook post? The paper avoids making that calculation. It argues that social media can enhance reputation and trust, but the studies cited "offer no judgment on whether social media is good for privacy in any absolute sense."

It would be rather useful to know whether social media is good for privacy in an absolute sense. Alas, the study's main point is that "it is possible to design social media systems that are engaging and supportive of privacy and trust."

For Google, that's good news. It just happens to have a social network. Imagine the problems the company would face were it not possible to design social media systems that are engaging and supportive of privacy and trust.

Still, the data cited to support the linkage between social media and privacy is underwhelming. One of the studies mentioned in the paper deals with vanity searches--searching for one's own name--and concludes that "vanity searches are often closely associated with reputation concern." That's not exactly surprising, but the paper characterizes this as a privacy need. Another way to put it might be that vanity searches expose privacy failures, or publicity.

The second study mentioned in the paper explores how social annotations--Facebook Likes and Google +1s and article popularity ratings--next to news articles affect reader engagement. Four groups with an average of about 95 people in them were asked separately about their interest in sharing news articles, both with and without social annotations. With interest rated on a scale of 1 (least interested in sharing) to 5 (most interested in sharing), the average for articles with Facebook annotations was 2.39. For articles without any annotations, the average was 2.32. And for articles annotated with a popularity ranking, the average was 2.35.

So adding a 'Like' button provides 0.07 points (on average) more interest in sharing than not having a Like button. From this, we get, "social annotations in search support privacy by enabling better self-representation and thus more privacy-aware sharing."

Certainly, social media conveys some benefits. It's a stretch to say that privacy is among them.

Heightened concern that users could inadvertently expose or leak--or purposely steal--an organization's sensitive data has spurred debate over the proper technology and training to protect the crown jewels. An Insider Threat Reality Check, a special retrospective of recent news coverage, takes a look at how organizations are handling the threat--and what users are really up to. (Free registration required.)

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BPM For Real
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BPM For Real,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/9/2012 | 4:15:21 PM
re: Google Study: Social Media Enhances Privacy
The article goes into great detail on why social media enhances privacy but the best part is how Facebook ended its 'privacy policy' and instead has a 'data use' policy. It is about how data is used.

Social media absolutely allows for privacy for those who choose. I use Facebook, and I may expose some things to the public but I have the ability to turn this off as well. I can choose which of my friends see/know things about me. Compared to where we were a few years ago, this is much more private than public websites, blogs, and forums. Far more.

Social media has gotten a bad rap on privacy primarily because people haven't managed it very well. There are those that shout things they should't share and those who allow anyone to see their whispered thoughts. Two extremes, both complained about as "loss of privacy." Much of this we bring on ourselves.

At work I use a tool that allows me to log in, decide who and what subjects to follow, allows me to create private subjects and to invite only the people I choose, etc. It is more private that having a meeting in a conference room that others can see on my calendar or through the glass. It is the most private thing I know other than the thoughts in my head and it is entirely social. It is my choice.

While privacy and social may seem polar opposite words, they aren't. It all depends on how the data is used.
Deb Donston-Miller
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Deb Donston-Miller,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/30/2012 | 10:35:26 AM
re: Google Study: Social Media Enhances Privacy
It does sound like she is talking more about protecting reputation than privacy, which I think are two different things.

Deb Donston-Miller
Contributing Editor, The BrainYard
Bprince
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Bprince,
User Rank: Ninja
1/30/2012 | 5:25:22 AM
re: Google Study: Social Media Enhances Privacy
Sounds somewhat counterintuitive to say social media enhances privacy, but the idea that it can be used to build trust I think is valid.
Brian Prince, InformationWeek/Dark Reading Comment Moderator
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