Risk
7/6/2011
02:21 PM
Connect Directly
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%

Consumers In The Cloud: Businesses Beware

Companies should take a hard look at what cloud services their employees are using following last week's authentication bug at Dropbox.

For four hours last week, a flawed authentication update allowed anyone the ability to access the data of any user of the cloud storage service Dropbox.

The error could have caused a massive privacy breach. As it turned out, the company was notified and fixed the error before widespread knowledge allowed the vulnerability to be exploited by malicious actors.

"According to our records, there were fewer than a hundred affected users, and neither account settings nor files were modified in any of these accounts," the company wrote in a blog post last Friday. "At this point, we have contacted all these users and provided them more detail."

Security experts point to the incident as a reminder that the consumer cloud can still cause problems for businesses. While Dropbox is aimed at individuals, the company has not made a secret of its business aspirations: Last year, it surveyed usersabout how they use the service to help their businesses. Articles on the benefits of cloud storage services, such as Dropbox and iCloud, are widespread on the Web.

Consumers are increasingly bringing their personal technology into the workplace, much to the chagrin of CSOs. With cloud services such as Dropbox, companies need to make sure that sensitive corporate data is not being posted to the cloud.

Dropbox encrypts data on the servers, but not to individual accounts, notes Sorin Mustaca, a product manager with security firm Avira. Anyone with admin access to the server can read all of its data. In addition, data on the servers of external services have lesser legal protections, Mustaca says.

"I always advise our users to be very, very careful what they put online because if they put anything online, then the data does not belong to them anymore--it belongs to the cloud," Mustaca says. "This is the most important lesson that needs to be learned by anybody. If you put it online, you lose control of the data."

Cloud services should allow users to encrypt their information, thus making mass breaches much more difficult, if not impossible. A week ago, Dropbox users started calling for better encryption, but it isn't clear yet whether the service provider will offer that feature. Dropbox prides itself on its ease of use--adding individual passwords would make the service more difficult to use and more costly, says Puneesh Chaudhry, co-founder and CEO of data management start-up Copiun.



Read the rest of this article on Dark Reading.

Security monitoring, incident response, and forensics are essential, even in the cloud. But the cloud by definition implies relinquishing at least some control, which can make these practices problematic. In this report, we identify the challenges of detecting and responding to security issues in the cloud and discuss the most effective ways to address them. Download our report now. (Free registration required.)

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
Partner Perspectives
What's This?
In a digital world inundated with advanced security threats, Intel Security seeks to transform how we live and work to keep our information secure. Through hardware and software development, Intel Security delivers robust solutions that integrate security into every layer of every digital device. In combining the security expertise of McAfee with the innovation, performance, and trust of Intel, this vision becomes a reality.

As we rely on technology to enhance our everyday and business life, we must too consider the security of the intellectual property and confidential data that is housed on these devices. As we increase the number of devices we use, we increase the number of gateways and opportunity for security threats. Intel Security takes the “security connected” approach to ensure that every device is secure, and that all security solutions are seamlessly integrated.
Featured Writers
White Papers
Cartoon
Current Issue
Dark Reading's October Tech Digest
Fast data analysis can stymie attacks and strengthen enterprise security. Does your team have the data smarts?
Flash Poll
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2014-8243
Published: 2014-11-01
Linksys SMART WiFi firmware on EA2700 and EA3500 devices; before 2.1.41 build 162351 on E4200v2 and EA4500 devices; before 1.1.41 build 162599 on EA6200 devices; before 1.1.40 build 160989 on EA6300, EA6400, EA6500, and EA6700 devices; and before 1.1.42 build 161129 on EA6900 devices allows remote a...

CVE-2014-8244
Published: 2014-11-01
Linksys SMART WiFi firmware on EA2700 and EA3500 devices; before 2.1.41 build 162351 on E4200v2 and EA4500 devices; before 1.1.41 build 162599 on EA6200 devices; before 1.1.40 build 160989 on EA6300, EA6400, EA6500, and EA6700 devices; and before 1.1.42 build 161129 on EA6900 devices allows remote a...

CVE-2013-0334
Published: 2014-10-31
Bundler before 1.7, when multiple top-level source lines are used, allows remote attackers to install arbitrary gems by creating a gem with the same name as another gem in a different source.

CVE-2014-2334
Published: 2014-10-31
Multiple cross-site scripting (XSS) vulnerabilities in the Web User Interface in Fortinet FortiAnalyzer before 5.0.7 allow remote attackers to inject arbitrary web script or HTML via unspecified vectors, a different vulnerability than CVE-2014-2336.

CVE-2014-2335
Published: 2014-10-31
Multiple cross-site scripting (XSS) vulnerabilities in the Web User Interface in Fortinet FortiManager before 5.0.7 allow remote attackers to inject arbitrary web script or HTML via unspecified vectors, a different vulnerability than CVE-2014-2336.

Best of the Web
Dark Reading Radio
Archived Dark Reading Radio
Follow Dark Reading editors into the field as they talk with noted experts from the security world.