Risk
1/24/2012
03:49 PM
Connect Directly
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%
Repost This

7 Tools To Tighten Healthcare Data Security

Most of the largest healthcare data security and privacy breaches have involved lost or stolen mobile computing devices. Consider these tools and tips for protecting patient data and managing breaches.
Previous
1 of 7
Next


Smartphones, tablets, and other mobile devices can help facilitate better communication and more extensive patient-caregiver interaction. But they're also easy to lose and more challenging for IT departments to manage.

In fact, mobile devices--including laptop computers, flash drives, and other portable gear--have been involved with some of the largest Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) breaches to date affecting 500 or more individuals, according to the Dept. of Health and Human Services, which tracks those incidents on a data breach reporting website that healthcare players have dubbed, the Hall of Shame.

At the same time, healthcare providers have a lot more to lose besides their reputations when it comes to HIPAA violations: Under the HITECH Act, HHS now can impose penalties of as much as $1.5 million annually per organization--per hospital or doc practice--for violating HIPAA privacy rules.

Unfortunately, many of the largest data and security incidents--as well as large HIPAA breaches involving paper documents--have been caused by human error, according to HHS. But besides improving training of staff about best practices for protecting patient data privacy and security--and not allowing any sensitive data to be stored on mobile devices themselves--healthcare organizations can tap an array of vendors' software and other products to safeguard protected health information. Here's a look at some of those tools.

Previous
1 of 7
Next
Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Cartoon
Current Issue
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2012-0360
Published: 2014-04-23
Memory leak in Cisco IOS before 15.1(1)SY, when IKEv2 debugging is enabled, allows remote attackers to cause a denial of service (memory consumption) via crafted packets, aka Bug ID CSCtn22376.

CVE-2012-1317
Published: 2014-04-23
The multicast implementation in Cisco IOS before 15.1(1)SY allows remote attackers to cause a denial of service (Route Processor crash) by sending packets at a high rate, aka Bug ID CSCts37717.

CVE-2012-1366
Published: 2014-04-23
Cisco IOS before 15.1(1)SY on ASR 1000 devices, when Multicast Listener Discovery (MLD) tracking is enabled for IPv6, allows remote attackers to cause a denial of service (device reload) via crafted MLD packets, aka Bug ID CSCtz28544.

CVE-2012-3062
Published: 2014-04-23
Cisco IOS before 15.1(1)SY, when Multicast Listener Discovery (MLD) snooping is enabled, allows remote attackers to cause a denial of service (CPU consumption or device crash) via MLD packets on a network that contains many IPv6 hosts, aka Bug ID CSCtr88193.

CVE-2012-3918
Published: 2014-04-23
Cisco IOS before 15.3(1)T on Cisco 2900 devices, when a VWIC2-2MFT-T1/E1 card is configured for TDM/HDLC mode, allows remote attackers to cause a denial of service (serial-interface outage) via certain Frame Relay traffic, aka Bug ID CSCub13317.

Best of the Web