Perimeter

3/28/2016
01:23 PM
Connect Directly
Twitter
Twitter
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%

Like It Or Not, Firewalls Still Front And Center

Firewalls are still central to most network defense strategies, new State of the Firewall report says.

In spite of lots of advanced technology and moves to add many more layers of security to most enterprise defenses, firewalls aren't going anywhere soon as the heart of the cybersecurity toolset, according to a new report out today. Based on a survey of over 600 IT security practitioners, the State of the Firewall Report shows that the firewall is as entrenched as ever in modern network defense strategies.

"We're seeing small shifts in IT professionals' perceptions of the firewall as new technologies enter the market," says Jody Brazil, co-founder and chief product strategy officer at FireMon. "Adoption of SDN and network virtualization in general won't decrease the need for firewalls, but it may open the door to advancements or a new category of network protection. It will be more of a continuous evolution rather than a complete upheaval as so many are quick to claim."

According to survey respondents, 91% of security practitioners say that firewalls are as critical as always or more critical than ever to their security architecture, and the same ratio believe this will continue to be the case for the next half decade. These conclusions jibe with other industry reports that show how central firewalls still remain to network defense and management. For example, the InformationWeek 2015 Strategic Security Survey saw 61% of security practitioners reporting firewalls among their top three products on their security tool belt, the number one tool by some 25 percentage points.

Firewall technology and firewall strategies seem to be adjusting to the cloud and hybrid architectures today, as the number of organizations who find value in traditional and next generation firewalls (NGFW) for cloud services they manage increased by 10% in the past year, with over 67.7% of respondents finding them somewhat to highly valuable in cloud management.

That's not to say that changes in networking architecture won't impact firewall strategies; in fact, 90% of those surveyed report that software-defined networking (SDN) has impacted or will impact networking to a certain degree. And more than three times the number of respondents this year say they believe that native controls found in SDN solutions and new technologies will eventually pose a threat to the firewall's hegemony.

But with SDN adoption still in its infancy, that's a ways off. What's more, advancements in NGFW may offer a forward-looking roadmap that jibes with most organizations' security strategies, with or without SDN. Approximately, 66.5% of those surveyed say that NGFW plays a role in their SDN/virtualized environments.

As things stand, 50% of current firewall infrastructure in close to half of organizations is comprised of NGFWs, as compared to 34% in 2014. And only 6.7% of organizations today have no NGFW. The top benefits organizatons hope to gain from NGFW are IPS functionality, threat data integration and applicaton awareness.

"The threat to the firewall as the center of the security infrastructure is not immediate. It continues to play a critical role in the majority of today’s enterprises," the report stated. "However, the role of the firewall will have to evolve more as NGFWs become the norm and as emerging infrastructure paradigms such as SDN, cloud and micro-segmentation take hold."

Related Content:

 

Interop 2016 Las VegasFind out more about security threats at Interop 2016, May 2-6, at the Mandalay Bay Convention Center, Las Vegas. Click here for pricing information and to register.

Ericka Chickowski specializes in coverage of information technology and business innovation. She has focused on information security for the better part of a decade and regularly writes about the security industry as a contributor to Dark Reading.  View Full Bio

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
Government Shutdown Brings Certificate Lapse Woes
Curtis Franklin Jr., Senior Editor at Dark Reading,  1/11/2019
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon Contest
Write a Caption, Win a Starbucks Card! Click Here
Latest Comment: On the SS7 network, nobody knows you're a dog.
Current Issue
The Year in Security 2018
This Dark Reading Tech Digest explores the biggest news stories of 2018 that shaped the cybersecurity landscape.
Flash Poll
How Enterprises Are Attacking the Cybersecurity Problem
How Enterprises Are Attacking the Cybersecurity Problem
Data breach fears and the need to comply with regulations such as GDPR are two major drivers increased spending on security products and technologies. But other factors are contributing to the trend as well. Find out more about how enterprises are attacking the cybersecurity problem by reading our report today.
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2018-18812
PUBLISHED: 2019-01-16
The Spotfire Library component of TIBCO Software Inc.'s TIBCO Spotfire Analytics Platform for AWS Marketplace, and TIBCO Spotfire Server contains a vulnerability that might theoretically fail to restrict users with read-only access from modifying files stored in the Spotfire Library, only when the S...
CVE-2018-18813
PUBLISHED: 2019-01-16
The Spotfire web server component of TIBCO Software Inc.'s TIBCO Spotfire Analytics Platform for AWS Marketplace, and TIBCO Spotfire Server contains multiple vulnerabilities that may allow persistent and reflected cross-site scripting attacks. Affected releases are TIBCO Software Inc. TIBCO Spotfire...
CVE-2018-18814
PUBLISHED: 2019-01-16
The TIBCO Spotfire authentication component of TIBCO Software Inc.'s TIBCO Spotfire Analytics Platform for AWS Marketplace, and TIBCO Spotfire Server contains a vulnerability in the handling of the authentication that theoretically may allow an attacker to gain full access to a target account, indep...
CVE-2018-5740
PUBLISHED: 2019-01-16
"deny-answer-aliases" is a little-used feature intended to help recursive server operators protect end users against DNS rebinding attacks, a potential method of circumventing the security model used by client browsers. However, a defect in this feature makes it easy, when the feature is i...
CVE-2018-5741
PUBLISHED: 2019-01-16
To provide fine-grained controls over the ability to use Dynamic DNS (DDNS) to update records in a zone, BIND 9 provides a feature called update-policy. Various rules can be configured to limit the types of updates that can be performed by a client, depending on the key used when sending the update ...