Mobile
11/5/2014
11:25 AM
Adam Ely
Adam Ely
Commentary
Connect Directly
Twitter
LinkedIn
RSS
E-Mail vvv
100%
0%

iOS 8 Vs. Android: How Secure Is Your Data?

With iOS 8, the lines between iOS and Android are blurring. No longer is iOS the heavily fortified environment and Android the wide-open one.

Apple recently released iOS 8, several updates, and two iPhone 6 models. There has been plenty of noise around the releases, from the botched 8.0.1 update to the Touch ID fake fingerprint vulnerability to concerns that Apple Pay was pushing mobile PCI scope and unknowingly sharing consumer data.

The ever-changing security posture of iOS, however, has yet to be discussed. Apple released an updated iOS security whitepaper covering Touch ID, the “Secure Enclave,” and everything in between. The paper is a good read for those curious about how hardware plays into the security posture of a device and features of the iOS operating system.

There are a number of security features on iOS 8 that were included to increase the adoption of Touch ID and Apple Pay. The security features are different from previous iOS releases and updates because the operating system is becoming a less restrictive platform.

Often, enterprises criticize Android for being too open and allowing too much interaction among applications via broadcast receivers. With the new iOS 8, we’re seeing more similarities when comparing iOS to Android. As a result, enterprises should be more concerned with the trust-worthiness of devices versus the actual operating systems.

(Source: Methodshop)
(Source: Methodshop)

For example, one of the worst cases I’ve seen for key logging and data theft is when users download third-party keyboards that leak or steal data on Android. Many infosec people I’ve spoken to use this simple example to explain why iOS is more secure than Android. While previous iOS versions did not allow third-party keyboards, iOS 8 does.

But the real harbinger of the future, in my view, is the introduction of app extensions in iOS 8. App extensions allow applications to make certain functionalities available to other applications. Proving Apple’s intent to make its ecosystem more integrated, these iOS extensions are different from what we see in Android; the iOS extensions give unrelated applications the ability to interact. (Whether the application you just downloaded really needs access to your SMS messages is another question.)

Another potential trouble spot is the introduction of App Groups, which allows applications from the same developer to share data with one another. While this information sharing is nothing new, it has always been done through either the server side or unsupported, covert channels, usually unbeknownst to the user. What makes the intro of App Groups a concern is that this allows applications, by the same developer, to share the same sandbox. Now the security (or insecurity) of one app could affect the security of another app. Because organizations split application development up into teams and outsourced developers, the security of apps, even when from the same company, is not uniform. This opens up organizations and consumers to greater risk.

[Read about more infosec headaches: Is Enterprise IT Security Ready For iOS 8?]

The lines between iOS and Android are blurring. No longer is iOS the heavily fortified environment and Android the wide-open one. Android is beginning to add more enterprise security features to its operating systems, and iOS is beginning to open its kimono, making it easier for developers to create apps. In the future, these two operating systems will continue to look more alike, driving the need for CISOs to focus on securing applications on mobile devices and on data security, rather than focusing on the devices themselves.

Adam Ely is the founder and COO of Bluebox. Prior to this role, Adam was the CISO of the Heroku business unit at Salesforce where he was responsible for application security, security operations, compliance, and external security relations. Prior to Salesforce, Adam led ... View Full Bio
Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
SDiver
50%
50%
SDiver,
User Rank: Strategist
11/13/2014 | 9:31:01 AM
Secure Element vs. HCE
Unfortunately, I think this article misses the heart of the differences between iOS and Android.  Apple utilizes a Secure Elemenent (SE) which is a hardware device that stores cardholder data crytpgographically while Wallet uses a software emulation of the SE called the Host Card Emulator (HCE).  The core difference is that the SE is a crytpographic hardware "black box" while the HCE is a software emulation of the HCE.


Software is traditionally one of the weakest points of security of any enterprise system so Google has their work cut out for them.  There have been compromises of Wallet in the past.  This article fails to compare the security between both solutions.
Helpful
100%
0%
Helpful,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/6/2014 | 12:32:33 PM
Misunderstood security of App Groups
An App Group is an Xcode mechanism of specifying that an App and it's Extension can access a shared data container. As shown in the diagram, the Extension must be enclosed within the App. The Extension's data container and the App's data container remain distinct and separate. An app by the same Company / Developer cannot access any of their other app containers. Apple does not break the fundamental rule of sandboxing -- not even for a Developer's set of apps. See Figure 4-1 on Apple's documentation, it illustrates the very secure sand boxing of App Extensions and the true usage of App Groups: https://developer.apple.com/library/ios/documentation/General/Conceptual/ExtensibilityPG/ExtensionScenarios.html
Helpful
50%
50%
Helpful,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/6/2014 | 12:25:25 PM
Mis-understood usage of Extensions
An App Extension is another word for "widget", a user-facing capability. The Extension is small set of information that the App Developer has decided to display within the Notification Center. Apple keeps the Developer within his app, there is no data spill into other apps nor from other apps.
Marilyn Cohodas
50%
50%
Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Strategist
11/5/2014 | 4:07:53 PM
iOS 8 Vs Android
This is indeed an interested development , Adam. Thanks for sharing your insights. On the Android side of the equation, I'm curious to know what enterprise security features Android has added to its operating systems that's making it a tougher competitor to iOS 8.
20 Questions to Ask Yourself before Giving a Security Conference Talk
Joshua Goldfarb, Co-founder & Chief Product Officer, IDDRA,  10/16/2017
Printers: The Weak Link in Enterprise Security
Kelly Sheridan, Associate Editor, Dark Reading,  10/16/2017
Hyatt Hit With Another Credit Card Breach
Dark Reading Staff 10/13/2017
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon Contest
Current Issue
Security Vulnerabilities: The Next Wave
Just when you thought it was safe, researchers have unveiled a new round of IT security flaws. Is your enterprise ready?
Flash Poll
[Strategic Security Report] How Enterprises Are Attacking the IT Security Problem
[Strategic Security Report] How Enterprises Are Attacking the IT Security Problem
Enterprises are spending more of their IT budgets on cybersecurity technology. How do your organization's security plans and strategies compare to what others are doing? Here's an in-depth look.
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2017-0290
Published: 2017-05-09
NScript in mpengine in Microsoft Malware Protection Engine with Engine Version before 1.1.13704.0, as used in Windows Defender and other products, allows remote attackers to execute arbitrary code or cause a denial of service (type confusion and application crash) via crafted JavaScript code within ...

CVE-2016-10369
Published: 2017-05-08
unixsocket.c in lxterminal through 0.3.0 insecurely uses /tmp for a socket file, allowing a local user to cause a denial of service (preventing terminal launch), or possibly have other impact (bypassing terminal access control).

CVE-2016-8202
Published: 2017-05-08
A privilege escalation vulnerability in Brocade Fibre Channel SAN products running Brocade Fabric OS (FOS) releases earlier than v7.4.1d and v8.0.1b could allow an authenticated attacker to elevate the privileges of user accounts accessing the system via command line interface. With affected version...

CVE-2016-8209
Published: 2017-05-08
Improper checks for unusual or exceptional conditions in Brocade NetIron 05.8.00 and later releases up to and including 06.1.00, when the Management Module is continuously scanned on port 22, may allow attackers to cause a denial of service (crash and reload) of the management module.

CVE-2017-0890
Published: 2017-05-08
Nextcloud Server before 11.0.3 is vulnerable to an inadequate escaping leading to a XSS vulnerability in the search module. To be exploitable a user has to write or paste malicious content into the search dialogue.