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8/29/2018
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7 Steps to Start Searching with Shodan

The right know-how can turn the search engine for Internet-connected devices into a powerful tool for security professionals.
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In the toolkit carried by hackers under any shade of hat, a search engine has become an essential component. Shodan, a search engine built to crawl and search Internet-connected devices, has become a go-to for researchers who want to quickly find the Internet-facing devices on an organization's network.

With skilled use, Shodan can present a researcher with the devices in an address range, the number of devices in a network, or any of a number of different results based on the criteria of the search. 

There are many ways to approach Shodan, but the following seven steps will get you started in the right direction. Have you already begun with Shodan? Are you a Shodan ninja? What tips do you have for beginners? Share your thoughts in the comments.

(Image: Shodan)

 

Curtis Franklin Jr. is Senior Editor at Dark Reading. In this role he focuses on product and technology coverage for the publication. In addition he works on audio and video programming for Dark Reading and contributes to activities at Interop ITX, Black Hat, INsecurity, and ... View Full Bio

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