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11/22/2013
02:18 PM
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LG Admits Smart TVs Spied On Users

LG admits it collected information on consumers' viewing habits, promises firmware update to honor opt-out requests.

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Mathew
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Mathew,
User Rank: Apprentice
12/2/2013 | 6:28:09 AM
Re: even when disable
Agreed, Shepy. If LG was sending anonymized usage data -- as smartphones do (assuming it's anonymized) -- to test latency and software performance or firmware bugs, that would be one thing. But this is for unalloyed marketing and tracking purposes.
Shepy
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Shepy,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/28/2013 | 7:13:07 AM
even when disable
Having it still report this stuff back even after it had been deselected in the options amounts to intentional spying imo
SachinEE
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SachinEE,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/27/2013 | 1:54:15 AM
Re : LG Admits Smart TVs Spied On Users
@ Michael Endler, you are right. LG has not been clever enough otherwise they are not doing any different from other companies. It seems they made a mistake or maybe they were not smart enough technologically to hide that option in preferences. They had better removed that option altogether so that users had to wait for some "Snowden" to tell them about LG's spying.
SachinEE
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SachinEE,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/27/2013 | 1:54:11 AM
Re : LG Admits Smart TVs Spied On Users
Enough with these prying terms and conditions buried deep within a mile long terms and conditions page. Whenever we find something flouting our privacy so shamelessly, we get the similar answer that you agreed to the terms and conditions. It is easy for manufacturers or service providers to tell the customers every term and condition about payable money in plain terms and bury such information deep down making it ever more impossible to read.
J_Brandt
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J_Brandt,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/24/2013 | 4:38:27 PM
Next
Your phone reports where you've been and who you know.  Your TV reports what you watch.  Next will be your refrigerator reporting on what food you eat. 
Brian.Dean
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Brian.Dean,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/23/2013 | 11:16:00 AM
Re: Sheesh
FFrancisco, yes you are right in that any service that makes recommendation is going to either have primary information or secondary information about a user.

But your last line is confusing me, yes LG and Samsung is there but then there is also Sony, Toshiba, Panasonic and not to mention so many others. Making a comparison between Classes might be possible if we isolate any two brands, but here both brands do not even have simpler Classes, and if we get into features, aesthetic design, picture quality, user interface and remote controls then it will all mount to preference.

The kind of benefits that data can provide would make a product so cheap that either everyone would be using the techniques or that the firm that is the only one using it would be at the top however, even with Samsung being the top 4 entries in a refined search that only lists LG/Samsung and Smart TV it would be unfair to say that Samsung is considerably less expensive because even the Classes do not match.   
FFrancisco
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FFrancisco,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/23/2013 | 10:20:18 AM
Re: Sheesh
Any product that "makes recommendation based on users previous viewing preferences " is saving that info on a server somwhere. So Smart TV's as well as services are collecting data so they can provide the content the user is requesting. And yes, LG Smart TV's are considerably less expensive than Samsung Smart TV's.
Brian.Dean
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Brian.Dean,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/23/2013 | 9:16:10 AM
Re: Sheesh
YouTube has been doing the same thing but we don't mind. And at times I have even liked it when YouTube sends me an ad to watch a 23 minute long TED Talk video in order to watch a 3 minute video that I have selected, even with the skip button I have watched their 23 minute advertisement.

I think the problem is that Smart TVs should not try to do things that the internet does, at least not at the same pace, and definitely Smart TVs should not rob my USB file names, that's something a legitimate internet company does not ever dream of doing.

So we watch YouTube and YouTube watches us, likewise we watch television and the television watches us , ok I can live with that but only if LG's Smart TVs are cheaper then say Samsung's Smart TVs.
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Strategist
11/22/2013 | 10:48:38 PM
Re: Sheesh
@Tom: The second-to-top step is for your paint can and tools.  The top step is for your beer.  ;)
jwaters974
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50%
jwaters974,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/22/2013 | 8:00:13 PM
easy solution -
don't buy LG products period
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