Cloud

3/30/2016
10:10 AM
Connect Directly
Twitter
Twitter
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%

Cybercrime: A Black Market Price List From The Dark Web

What does it cost for malware, stolen identities and other tools of the cybercriminal trade? Probably less than you think.
Previous
1 of 10
Next

Image Source: Adobe Stock

Image Source: Adobe Stock

There's no better lesson in the mechanics of a free market than watching a black market at work. And in this era of cybercrime, there may be no better observational laboratory of black market dynamics than on the Dark Web. For years now, security researchers have observed the evolution of the cybercrime economy, as malware authors, identity thieves and fraudsters have peddled their wares in a marketplace that has grown increasingly specialized in its division of labor. 

Today, the menu of options is staggering, with many widely available items and services becoming quickly commoditized. Social security numbers, stolen credit card numbers and full identity information run for as cheap as a few bucks each. Botnet booter rentals can be had for under $100 a day to conduct DDoS and stressor campaigns against targets. And many malware authors offer both software for sale and malware-as-a-service in the SaaS model for a range of prices.

Additional services and differentiated items like 0-day vulnerability information net attackers more lucrative price points, as attackers seek out the means for targeted campaigns. The illicit shops and salespeople on the Deep Web operate as true businesses, with many components of committing cybercrime bundled in special discount packages for customers seeking the best bang for their criminal buck.  It is truly a complex and sophisticated economy out there.

We've compiled some of the prices to give readers a feel for how cheaply crooks can get started in their criminal enterprises. All prices are given in USD, unless otherwise noted.

 

Ericka Chickowski specializes in coverage of information technology and business innovation. She has focused on information security for the better part of a decade and regularly writes about the security industry as a contributor to Dark Reading.  View Full Bio

Previous
1 of 10
Next
Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
Government Shutdown Brings Certificate Lapse Woes
Curtis Franklin Jr., Senior Editor at Dark Reading,  1/11/2019
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon Contest
Current Issue
The Year in Security 2018
This Dark Reading Tech Digest explores the biggest news stories of 2018 that shaped the cybersecurity landscape.
Flash Poll
How Enterprises Are Attacking the Cybersecurity Problem
How Enterprises Are Attacking the Cybersecurity Problem
Data breach fears and the need to comply with regulations such as GDPR are two major drivers increased spending on security products and technologies. But other factors are contributing to the trend as well. Find out more about how enterprises are attacking the cybersecurity problem by reading our report today.
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2019-6487
PUBLISHED: 2019-01-18
TP-Link WDR Series devices through firmware v3 (such as TL-WDR5620 V3.0) are affected by command injection (after login) leading to remote code execution, because shell metacharacters can be included in the weather get_weather_observe citycode field.
CVE-2018-20735
PUBLISHED: 2019-01-17
** DISPUTED ** An issue was discovered in BMC PATROL Agent through 11.3.01. It was found that the PatrolCli application can allow for lateral movement and escalation of privilege inside a Windows Active Directory environment. It was found that by default the PatrolCli / PATROL Agent application only...
CVE-2019-0624
PUBLISHED: 2019-01-17
A spoofing vulnerability exists when a Skype for Business 2015 server does not properly sanitize a specially crafted request, aka "Skype for Business 2015 Spoofing Vulnerability." This affects Skype.
CVE-2019-0646
PUBLISHED: 2019-01-17
A Cross-site Scripting (XSS) vulnerability exists when Team Foundation Server does not properly sanitize user provided input, aka "Team Foundation Server Cross-site Scripting Vulnerability." This affects Team.
CVE-2019-0647
PUBLISHED: 2019-01-17
An information disclosure vulnerability exists when Team Foundation Server does not properly handle variables marked as secret, aka "Team Foundation Server Information Disclosure Vulnerability." This affects Team.