Cloud

10/13/2016
04:40 PM
Connect Directly
Twitter
LinkedIn
Google+
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%

80% Of IT Pros Say Users Set Up Unapproved Cloud Services

Shadow IT is a growing risk concern among IT pros, with most reporting users have gone behind their backs to set up unapproved cloud services.

A conflict of interest is driving the rise of shadow IT among organizations.

Tech pros are responsible for controlling and safeguarding data; employees want to accomplish tasks as efficiently as possible. As a result, more workers have begun to use cloud-based tools without consulting IT to verify their security.

This is the key takeaway from a new SpiceWorks study entitled "Data Snapshot: Security, privacy, and the shadowy risks of bypassing IT." To learn more about the growth and risk of this practice known as "shadow IT," researchers surveyed 338 IT pros across North America, Europe, the Middle East, and Africa.

Results indicate shadow IT poses a growing risk to businesses. Eighty percent of IT pros report their end users have secretly set up unapproved cloud services, and 40% claim users have gone behind their backs at least five times.

(Image: SpiceWorks)

(Image: SpiceWorks)

To employees, it may not seem dangerous to adopt cloud services like Dropbox or Google, which they often use outside the office, but tech pros are concerned. Nearly 40% of respondents believe shadow IT has increased their data's vulnerability in the past five years.

"End users don't typically understand the subtleties of end-to-end encryption, multi-factor authentication, or user access controls," explains Peter Tsai, IT analyst at SpiceWorks. "As a result, they might share confidential data using unapproved IT services where they might accidentally be made public or pass through insecure, unencrypted channels through which a hacker could intercept them." 

Which services are driving the threat? Cloud storage services top the list, with 35% of IT pros claiming these are most vulnerable to attack. Next up are Web-based email services like Gmail and Exchange Online, which are considered most vulnerable among 27% of tech pros.

"Because it only takes a few minutes for anyone to sign up for these accounts, it becomes trivial for even non-technical users to set up," explains Tsai. "However, most end users don't think through the security implications of sending or storing sensitive company data using free services that arean't necessarily designed with enterprise security in mind."

It seems the risk is greater for larger companies. Nearly half (47%) of IT pros at companies with 500+ employees report their data is at greater risk. As businesses grow, it's harder for IT managers to keep track of employees and the multitude of cloud services they use.

The threat is certainly growing, but what are businesses doing to mitigate risk? Most (72%) claim their company sufficiently invests in protecting their data, and 68% say data privacy is a top priority.

When it comes to best practices for keeping data safe in the cloud, respondents were nearly equal on the importance of three security measures: end-to-end data encryption (68%), multi-factor authentication (67%), and user access controls (67%). More than half (51%) of IT pros said vetting a cloud vendor's security practices is essential.

Tsai also emphasizes the importance of ensuring employees understand how unapproved cloud services could put corporate data at risk. IT pros can also restrict the websites end users visit and the software they install.

"Additionally, IT departments should strive to understand user needs and provide the tools and applications they want to use, so workers aren’t tempted to go behind IT's back to begin with," he adds.

The study indicates there is more that could be done to improve security. Less than half (47%) of respondents say their company conducts regular security audits. Less than one-third (28%) are actively trying to improve their data privacy strategy following highly publicized breaches.

Related Content:

Kelly Sheridan is the Staff Editor at Dark Reading, where she focuses on cybersecurity news and analysis. She is a business technology journalist who previously reported for InformationWeek, where she covered Microsoft, and Insurance & Technology, where she covered financial ... View Full Bio

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
RegisPar
50%
50%
RegisPar,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/23/2017 | 9:51:37 AM
Speed of Business
I'm seeing several companies going to the cloud without an IT expert aware because business areas need to be fast and deliver new products frequently. Unfortunately, the IT isn't living this new age where a new product, new fuctionality or new option must be delivered more frequently than we was familiarized in the past. This new age requires more flexibility, more easyness and speed. 

I saw several companies where IT Security people found new apps running on the cloud by mistake. I saw users going alone to the cloud because when they requested new power to IT, received as answer a kind of 30... 45 days to deliver, I saw users going alone to the cloud because they want to start a project very light and have the capacity to grow fast if project has success but IT simply can't do it. 

Cloud is not for everything, not for everyone (at this moment, because market is changing so fast) but if our IT can't support market changes in terms of usability, flexibility and cost, there is no other way to go instead to the cloud, in a secure or insecure way. 
jdrosen2
50%
50%
jdrosen2,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/15/2016 | 10:36:50 AM
IT needs to treat this as an existential threat
Often times the IT response is to try and block or prohibit these services, but this is the wrong response. The reason users are using these services is that cloud technologies and mobile apps have now provided users a choice of providers, with IT being one vendor, and cloud services as the other. As such, what used to be an effective monopoly for IT - monopoly vendor of collaboration tools - is no longer so. IT needs to 'compete' to be relevant. That means, they need to up their game on selecting and providing tools which meet the needs of their users, and do the things that are causing users to seek these non-sanctioned tools. This in turn puts massive pressure on enterprise software vendors to provide tools which both users and IT can say yes to. That is the only way out of this dilemma.
Windows 10 Security Questions Prove Easy for Attackers to Exploit
Kelly Sheridan, Staff Editor, Dark Reading,  12/5/2018
Starwood Breach Reaction Focuses on 4-Year Dwell
Curtis Franklin Jr., Senior Editor at Dark Reading,  12/5/2018
Symantec Intros USB Scanning Tool for ICS Operators
Jai Vijayan, Freelance writer,  12/5/2018
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon Contest
Write a Caption, Win a Starbucks Card! Click Here
Latest Comment: I guess this answers the question: who's watching the watchers?
Current Issue
10 Best Practices That Could Reshape Your IT Security Department
This Dark Reading Tech Digest, explores ten best practices that could reshape IT security departments.
Flash Poll
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2018-10008
PUBLISHED: 2018-12-10
A code execution vulnerability exists in the Stapler web framework used by Jenkins 2.153 and earlier, LTS 2.138.3 and earlier in stapler/core/src/main/java/org/kohsuke/stapler/MetaClass.java that allows attackers to invoke some methods on Java objects by accessing crafted URLs that were not intended...
CVE-2018-10008
PUBLISHED: 2018-12-10
An information exposure vulnerability exists in Jenkins 2.153 and earlier, LTS 2.138.3 and earlier in DirectoryBrowserSupport.java that allows attackers with the ability to control build output to browse the file system on agents running builds beyond the duration of the build using the workspace br...
CVE-2018-10008
PUBLISHED: 2018-12-10
A data modification vulnerability exists in Jenkins 2.153 and earlier, LTS 2.138.3 and earlier in User.java, IdStrategy.java that allows attackers to submit crafted user names that can cause an improper migration of user record storage formats, potentially preventing the victim from logging into Jen...
CVE-2018-10008
PUBLISHED: 2018-12-10
A denial of service vulnerability exists in Jenkins 2.153 and earlier, LTS 2.138.3 and earlier in CronTab.java that allows attackers with Overall/Read permission to have a request handling thread enter an infinite loop.
CVE-2018-10008
PUBLISHED: 2018-12-10
A sandbox bypass vulnerability exists in Script Security Plugin 1.47 and earlier in groovy-sandbox/src/main/java/org/kohsuke/groovy/sandbox/SandboxTransformer.java that allows attackers with Job/Configure permission to execute arbitrary code on the Jenkins master JVM, if plugins using the Groovy san...