Cloud
3/12/2014
04:05 PM
Bill Kleyman
Bill Kleyman
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Your Cloud Was Breached. Now What?

You're not happy. You just experienced a breach. Here's how to keep calm and secure your cloud.

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Bill Kleyman
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Bill Kleyman,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/14/2014 | 11:16:26 AM
Re: Leave the intruder alone for a little while longer?
@Charlie - I was just waiting for someone to give me a solid use-case. The advanced nature of today's modern infrastructure allows us to do great things with technology. Virtualization, cloud, and a distributed platform optimizes data flow and application delivery.

However, all of this presents new types of targets. So, we have a few scenarios here...

There are a number of different types of cloud-based attacks that can and do happen. These include port attacks, DDoS, application-specific threats, database attacks and much more.

So the answer really depends on the attack and who it's against. Let's look at this example - According to a recent Arbor Networks report, DDoS attacks originally targeted Spamhaus on 16th March, 2013. Spamhaus engaged the services of CloudFlare (http://blog.cloudflare.com/) who were able to mitigate the initial attacks successfully. The attacks then escalated between 19th and 21st March exhausting the capabilities of CloudFlare. The report goes on to say that the attacks also moved on to target next-hop addresses at IX's around the world (AMS-IX, DEC-IC, HK-IX, Equinix and LINX) causing congestion and a perceived Internet slow down in some geographies. ISPs around the world have worked to deploy filters to mitigate the impact of the attacks.

In this case, it was a scramble to halt this type of congestion and attack.

In other cases, very specific attacks may target a service or an application. During this attack a malicious piece of software or user continue to run and operate on the system. In these cases you still need to isolate the application or data point to identify and quantify the ramifications of the attack. If it's a VM, snapshotting it will allow you to see present-state metrics around the attack. Of course, governance and compliance play a big role as well. 

Basically, there will be cases where a security professional will want to regain control, monitor, and remediate a potential attack. 
Bill Kleyman
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Bill Kleyman,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/14/2014 | 10:56:51 AM
Re: Thanks for great post.
I second that :) Much appreciated!
Charlie Babcock
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Charlie Babcock,
User Rank: Strategist
3/13/2014 | 12:34:24 PM
Leave the intruder alone for a little while longer?
Bill, your description of needing to be prepared to preserve the server and storage as is for forensic analysis is extremely interesting. Nice job of that. But tell me, doesn't that assume the damage caused by the breach is a fait accompli and over? What if an intruder or active malware is still at work? Do you have to allow it to continue as you go about snapshotting and recording? That would be hard to do.
Marilyn Cohodas
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Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Strategist
3/13/2014 | 11:21:43 AM
Re: Thanks for great post.
thanks for the complement for Bill, Eddiemayan. What did you like about the post? Tell us what you learned, or what you will do differently after reading it.
Eddie Mayan
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Eddie Mayan,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/13/2014 | 8:03:26 AM
Thanks for great post.
Thanks for great post.
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