Attacks/Breaches

2/20/2015
12:00 PM
Kerstyn Clover
Kerstyn Clover
Commentary
Connect Directly
Twitter
LinkedIn
RSS
E-Mail vvv
100%
0%

Who Cares Whos Behind A Data Breach?

Attribution takes a long time, a lot of work, and a healthy dose of luck. But is it worth the effort?

Recently, I cracked a joke suggesting that whenever a reporter asks during a breach investigation, "so who do you think is behind this…" I should start making up outlandish answers like:

  • “My sources believe it’s an alien plot to study human behavior.” 
  • Or, “Definitely the underground mole people.”
  • A colleague even suggested, “I think it was actually all filmed on a soundstage like the moon landing.”

In real life, however, discovering who is responsible for an incident might ultimately lead to some sort of recourse, but attribution generally takes a long time, a lot of work, and a healthy dose of luck. Identifying what happened and working to prevent that from happening again can't get my data back. But it can help reduce how often it's exposed.

So instead of pointing fingers, I do my best to steer the conversation toward two things that matter a lot more: verifying what happened and keeping it from happening again. If I get a notice that something like my social security number has been accessed, my major concerns are why it happened in the first place and what steps are being taken to protect my information in the future.

Identifying precisely what information was accessed and communicating this information to those compromised is a major first step. A victim who knows that their credit card number has been stolen can act to set up credit freezes or alerts on its use; the longer that notification is delayed, the more time an attacker has to complete their scams and distance themselves from the event. During investigations, evidence should be preserved so that an attempt can be made to identify the culprit later and first response can focus on determining the entire scope of the attack.

The concept of continuous improvement -- taking the lessons learned from a security incident and using them to mature the incident response program -- is also frequently overlooked. The post-breach time is obviously hectic, but it can also be turned into a huge learning opportunity, where weaknesses in the existing security program are highlighted so that they can be improved. Worse, if these aren't remediated, attackers face a lower barrier of entry to your systems, as these vulnerabilities have already been identified.

President Obama in his State of the Union in January proposed legislation that would require companies hit by a data breach to inform affected customers within 30 days of discovering exposure of the data. It is my hope is that any new cybersecurity legislation or regulation will also encourage information sharing of useful data, such as what was accessed and what is being done to improve security for next time.

What do you think about current practices in data breach response? Do you think that President Obama’s proposed reporting requirements are a step in the right direction? If you handle incident response, how much weight do you place on attribution versus other information gathered in the course of the investigation? Let’s chat about these issues in the comments.

As a staff consultant on the SecureState Attack and Defense Team, Kerstyn works with a broad range of organizations across a variety of industries on security assessments including incident response, forensic analysis, and social engineering. View Full Bio
Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
Page 1 / 3   >   >>
ODA155
50%
50%
ODA155,
User Rank: Ninja
2/26/2015 | 9:38:53 AM
Re: is it just human nature?
@Sara...

"Still though: if they sue a third party for doing a lousy job of securing data, they might be able to make a civil case out of it and win cash. But attribution -- learning who the attackers are -- will only lead to a criminal case, won't it? And the breached company isn't going to make any cash off of that, will they?"

Seriously! Look at the Anthem, Sony and Target breaches... who are they going to sue? From what we do know everyone of them were at the very least borderline negligent, doing only the very minimum to meet requirments ignoring or flat out dismissing warnings and examples of how other companies were successfully attacked.

It's way to easy to blame an attacker for breacking into your network and stealing whatever is available, but it's much harder to hold your own feet to the fire... and keep the shareholders happy.
Sara Peters
100%
0%
Sara Peters,
User Rank: Author
2/26/2015 | 9:26:13 AM
Re: is it just human nature?
@Kerstyn  I suppose when a company's trying to get back some of the dough they dropped on the breach recovery process they would make suing somebody for damages a priority.

Still though: if they sue a third party for doing a lousy job of securing data, they might be able to make a civil case out of it and win cash. But attribution -- learning who the attackers are -- will only lead to a criminal case, won't it? And the breached company isn't going to make any cash off of that, will they?

I confess that I don't know much about this -- I try to stay out of court rooms.  :)
Kerstyn Clover
100%
0%
Kerstyn Clover,
User Rank: Moderator
2/25/2015 | 10:16:48 PM
Re: is it just human nature?
Sara, I didn't realize it but I somewhat addressed this in my last reply to a comment of yours! Litigation definitely comes up frequently and it's pretty understandable, especially since there is usually a tangible business impact (at least by the time I get called in.)
Kerstyn Clover
100%
0%
Kerstyn Clover,
User Rank: Moderator
2/25/2015 | 10:12:28 PM
Re: Motive
In the vast majority of my experiences, everyone wants to know who did it and on top of that, how they can press charges. Unfortunately part of my response duties can be to explain the difficulties in not just attribution, but prosecution. It is usually after things have settled and we've had that conversation that we'll sit down and go over areas that were identified to have failed, or where defenses can be beefed up.
ODA155
100%
0%
ODA155,
User Rank: Ninja
2/25/2015 | 6:05:33 PM
Re: is it just human nature?
Sara,

Personally, it's a little more refined than a simple "...immediate, desperate need to assess blame...". Sure there is enough of that going around, but I think identifying the responsible parties is important as well as holding them accontable, and if you can catch the bad guys...OK.  And by responsible parties I tend to focus on the internal people at all levels who should be held responsible for protecting and safeguarding this information. As someone said on another topic some time ago, these companies put too much faith in the outcome of a risk assessment then they purchase insurance to protect their company, but then as in the case of Anthem, I and probably more than one person reading this gets an email telling us "how seriously they take security and protecting... blah blah blah", and give me two years of credit monitoring.
Sara Peters
50%
50%
Sara Peters,
User Rank: Author
2/25/2015 | 10:36:46 AM
Re: Motive
@Kerstyn  In your experience, do breached companies mostly want to know which outside criminal group is to blame for the attack, or which employee/executive is to blame for the failure of the company's security?
Sara Peters
50%
50%
Sara Peters,
User Rank: Author
2/25/2015 | 10:31:41 AM
is it just human nature?
Ya know, I've often wondered if this immediate, desperate need to assess blame -- not just for data breaches, but for EVERYTHING -- was a basic human instinct or a particularly American trait. In this exceptionally litigious US society, we're always looking for someone to sue, so of course attribution is important so that you can decide who to drag into court.

But maybe everyone feels the same need to know whodunit? Just so that the mystery is solved? What do you guys think?
SDiver
50%
50%
SDiver,
User Rank: Strategist
2/24/2015 | 9:48:43 AM
Re: Rod Sirling was right.
"The Monsters Are Due on Maple Street."  Good episode.
ODA155
50%
50%
ODA155,
User Rank: Ninja
2/24/2015 | 9:34:08 AM
Re: who cares? sheriff, maybe
...and as Mr. Snowden has also showed us and left out of his AMA speach, there will always be someone behind the scenes with the means to circumvent those systems and standards for what ever purpose they choose to be right or wrong.
macker490
50%
50%
macker490,
User Rank: Ninja
2/24/2015 | 8:43:12 AM
who cares? sheriff, maybe
Mr: Snowden noted in his recent AMA:

"The only way to ensure the human rights of citizens around the world are being respected in the digital realm is to enforce them through systems and standards rather than policies and procedures."

remember: the sheriff only cleans up a mess after it has been made.   better to not get into a mess,-- whether driving a car or running a 'puter.   prevention is better than cleanup.  and yes: malware can be stopped -- if you're interested in stopping it.
Page 1 / 3   >   >>
WebAuthn, FIDO2 Infuse Browsers, Platforms with Strong Authentication
John Fontana, Standards & Identity Analyst, Yubico,  9/19/2018
NSS Labs Files Antitrust Suit Against Symantec, CrowdStrike, ESET, AMTSO
Kelly Jackson Higgins, Executive Editor at Dark Reading,  9/19/2018
Turn the NIST Cybersecurity Framework into Reality: 5 Steps
Mukul Kumar & Anupam Sahai, CISO & VP of Cyber Practice and VP Product Management, Cavirin Systems,  9/20/2018
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon Contest
Write a Caption, Win a Starbucks Card! Click Here
Latest Comment: Are you sure this is how we get our data into the cloud?
Current Issue
Flash Poll
The Risk Management Struggle
The Risk Management Struggle
The majority of organizations are struggling to implement a risk-based approach to security even though risk reduction has become the primary metric for measuring the effectiveness of enterprise security strategies. Read the report and get more details today!
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2015-8298
PUBLISHED: 2018-09-24
Multiple SQL injection vulnerabilities in the login page in RXTEC RXAdmin UPDATE 06 / 2012 allow remote attackers to execute arbitrary SQL commands via the (1) loginpassword, (2) loginusername, (3) zusatzlicher, or (4) groupid parameter to index.htm, or the (5) rxtec cookie to index.htm.
CVE-2018-14825
PUBLISHED: 2018-09-24
A skilled attacker with advanced knowledge of the target system could exploit this vulnerability by creating an application that would successfully bind to the service and gain elevated system privileges. This could enable the attacker to obtain access to keystrokes, passwords, personal identifiable...
CVE-2018-17437
PUBLISHED: 2018-09-24
Memory leak in the H5O_dtype_decode_helper() function in H5Odtype.c in the HDF HDF5 through 1.10.3 library allows attackers to cause a denial of service (memory consumption) via a crafted HDF5 file.
CVE-2018-17438
PUBLISHED: 2018-09-24
A SIGFPE signal is raised in the function H5D__select_io() of H5Dselect.c in the HDF HDF5 through 1.10.3 library during an attempted parse of a crafted HDF file, because of incorrect protection against division by zero. It could allow a remote denial of service attack.
CVE-2018-17439
PUBLISHED: 2018-09-24
An issue was discovered in the HDF HDF5 1.10.3 library. There is a stack-based buffer overflow in the function H5S_extent_get_dims() in H5S.c. Specifically, this issue occurs while converting an HDF5 file to a GIF file.