Attacks/Breaches

5/15/2012
05:15 PM
Connect Directly
Google+
Twitter
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%

What A DDoS Can Cost

Around 65 percent of IT pros say a DDoS costs their organizations $240,000 in lost revenue per day of the attack, and one-fifth say it would mean a loss of $1.2 million per day, new survey finds

A distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attack can cost a victim organization as much as $10,000 to $50,000 per hour in lost revenue, according to a new survey.

Neustar polled 1,000 IT professionals in North America from various industries about DDoS attacks, and among the 300 businesses that said they had suffered one, 35 percent said the attack lasted more than 24 hours, and 11 percent said it lasted more than one week. One in 10 suffered a DDoS for more than a week, according to the data.

Around 65 percent said a DDoS would cost them $240,000 in revenue per day of the attack, or $10,000 per hour; 21 percent said it would mean a loss of $1.2 million per day, or $50,000 per hour. Much of the damage depends on the industry: More than 80 percent of financial-services companies said they would lose more than $10,000 per hour, and close to 70 percent of retailers said they would lose more than $2 million a day, or more than $100,000 per hour in revenue.

Ted Swearingen, director of the security operation center at Neustar, says DDoS attacks are on the rise, and no one is immune. "They are not just going after financial firms [only] ... we are seeing a lot smaller companies being targets," Swearingen says. In some of those smaller targets, the attacks may be motivated by protests, for instance, he says.

"We still want to make sure companies know DDoSes are here and growing bigger and more complex. You can't ignore them and [think], 'It's not going to happen to me,'" he says.

But lost revenue is actually the least of businesses' worries when it comes to DDoS. More than 50 percent said they worry about the affect on customer experience in the wake of a DDoS attack; 25 percent fear brand damage; 19 percent, revenue loss; and 5 percent, job loss.

"When you go down, customer support gets flooded," Swearingen says.

Telecommunications companies suffer the most DDoS attacks as an industry, with 55 percent reporting attacks in the survey, followed by financial services and travel, each at 32 percent. Nearly 30 percent of IT vendors have been hit, and 16 percent of retailers have, according to the Neustar survey.

"Folks in the retail section had been attacked at the lowest percentage, but if you go back and see what that affected, they had the highest cost per hour when they did get attacked," Swearingen says.

Meanwhile, less than 5 percent of the respondents said their infrastructure has been built with DDoS mitigation in mind or with DDoS mitigation tools.

The full DDoS report is available here from Neustar (PDF).

Have a comment on this story? Please click "Add Your Comment" below. If you'd like to contact Dark Reading's editors directly, send us a message.

Kelly Jackson Higgins is Executive Editor at DarkReading.com. She is an award-winning veteran technology and business journalist with more than two decades of experience in reporting and editing for various publications, including Network Computing, Secure Enterprise ... View Full Bio

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
kfoster
50%
50%
kfoster,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/16/2012 | 3:43:39 PM
re: What A DDoS Can Cost
-Don't forget about collateral damage.- You don't even have to be a target at all to get DoS'ed. If another company within your ISP gets hit, it will affect you. Sometimes a router in the same path of a DDoS will not withstand the traffic and you will feel the effects.
A DDoS is not a surgical strike against a single company. It is more like a block buster bomb that takes out not only the building, but the whole neighborhood.
High Stress Levels Impacting CISOs Physically, Mentally
Jai Vijayan, Freelance writer,  2/14/2019
Valentine's Emails Laced with Gandcrab Ransomware
Kelly Sheridan, Staff Editor, Dark Reading,  2/14/2019
Making the Case for a Cybersecurity Moon Shot
Adam Shostack, Consultant, Entrepreneur, Technologist, Game Designer,  2/19/2019
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon
Current Issue
5 Emerging Cyber Threats to Watch for in 2019
Online attackers are constantly developing new, innovative ways to break into the enterprise. This Dark Reading Tech Digest gives an in-depth look at five emerging attack trends and exploits your security team should look out for, along with helpful recommendations on how you can prevent your organization from falling victim.
Flash Poll
How Enterprises Are Attacking the Cybersecurity Problem
How Enterprises Are Attacking the Cybersecurity Problem
Data breach fears and the need to comply with regulations such as GDPR are two major drivers increased spending on security products and technologies. But other factors are contributing to the trend as well. Find out more about how enterprises are attacking the cybersecurity problem by reading our report today.
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2018-15380
PUBLISHED: 2019-02-20
A vulnerability in the cluster service manager of Cisco HyperFlex Software could allow an unauthenticated, adjacent attacker to execute commands as the root user. The vulnerability is due to insufficient input validation. An attacker could exploit this vulnerability by connecting to the cluster serv...
CVE-2019-3474
PUBLISHED: 2019-02-20
A path traversal vulnerability in the web application component of Micro Focus Filr 3.x allows a remote attacker authenticated as a low privilege user to download arbitrary files from the Filr server. This vulnerability affects all versions of Filr 3.x prior to Security Update 6.
CVE-2019-3475
PUBLISHED: 2019-02-20
A local privilege escalation vulnerability in the famtd component of Micro Focus Filr 3.0 allows a local attacker authenticated as a low privilege user to escalate to root. This vulnerability affects all versions of Filr 3.x prior to Security Update 6.
CVE-2019-10030
PUBLISHED: 2019-02-20
A sandbox bypass vulnerability exists in Jenkins Script Security Plugin 1.52 and earlier in RejectASTTransformsCustomizer.java that allows attackers with Overall/Read permission to provide a Groovy script to an HTTP endpoint that can result in arbitrary code execution on the Jenkins master JVM.
CVE-2019-10030
PUBLISHED: 2019-02-20
A exposure of sensitive information vulnerability exists in Jenkins Cloud Foundry Plugin 2.3.1 and earlier in AbstractCloudFoundryPushDescriptor.java that allows attackers with Overall/Read access to connect to an attacker-specified URL using attacker-specified credentials IDs obtained through anoth...