Attacks/Breaches
8/14/2014
04:45 PM
Connect Directly
Google+
Twitter
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%

Stuxnet Exploits Still Alive & Well

Exploits continue abusing a four-year-old bug used in the Stuxnet attack, Kaspersky Lab says.

One of the main vulnerabilities used in the infamous Stuxnet attack -- patched four years ago -- is being used in attack attempts against millions of machines around the world, according to new data.

Kaspersky Lab found that during November 2013 and June 2014, the Windows Shell flaw (CVE-2010-2568) used by Stuxnet to gain administrative rights on a Windows machine remotely was detected 50 million times attacking some 19 million machines in Vietnam (42.45%), India (11.7%), Indonesia (9.43%), Brazil (5.52%), and Algeria (3.74%).

Those nations also have some of the most Windows XP installations, which likely explains why a high percentage of them are the target of that Stuxnet vulnerability, according to Kaspersky Lab. Some 64.19% of those machines in the sample were XP; 27.99%, Windows 7; 3.99%, Windows Server 2008; and 1.58%, Windows Server 2003. Around 4.52% of all active XP machines are in the US, according to Kaspersky's data.

The "critical" Windows Shell flaw would let a remote or local attacker run code via a malicious .LNK or .PIF file via an improperly handled icon displayed in Windows Explorer. Microsoft issued a patch for the vulnerability on August 2, 2010; Stuxnet was first discovered in June of that year.

Kaspersky Lab researchers say the problem likely has to do with servers that aren't being updated or that lack proper security software. The servers also could be infested by a worm that exploits the flaw and spreads the infection.

"We have seen some vulnerabilities go back to 2009-2010, and I suspect that we can find even older examples. Therefore I am not surprised by a 2010 CVE that Stuxnet is using, is still viable," says Barry Sheitman, director of security strategy at Imperva.

The problem, of course, is that many black hat hackers know that old vulns die hard, so they abuse them, he says.

The full Kaspersky Lab Stuxnet report is available here.

Kelly Jackson Higgins is Executive Editor at DarkReading.com. She is an award-winning veteran technology and business journalist with more than two decades of experience in reporting and editing for various publications, including Network Computing, Secure Enterprise ... View Full Bio

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
securityaffairs
50%
50%
securityaffairs,
User Rank: Ninja
8/18/2014 | 1:25:44 PM
as expected
We must consider as primary causes the following:
  • Militarization of the cyberspace as as side effect diffusion for a long time of exploits used in the "cyber weapons"
  • Presence on the Internet for a great number of servers that aren't updated or that lack proper defensive solutions. 

No doubts that in the future a growing number of similar cases will be discovered

 

 
Kelly Jackson Higgins
50%
50%
Kelly Jackson Higgins,
User Rank: Strategist
8/18/2014 | 8:59:15 AM
Re: Four years old
It's mostly in nations with late-technology adoption and a lot of XP still hanging around. So that really old vulns are still exploitable in those regions is not really surprising.
Bprince
50%
50%
Bprince,
User Rank: Ninja
8/15/2014 | 8:44:18 PM
Four years old
A four-year old vulnerability? I mean honestly that's pretty negligent to me, especially if any of these are corporate machines. 

BP
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon
Current Issue
Flash Poll
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2014-9728
Published: 2015-08-31
The UDF filesystem implementation in the Linux kernel before 3.18.2 does not validate certain lengths, which allows local users to cause a denial of service (buffer over-read and system crash) via a crafted filesystem image, related to fs/udf/inode.c and fs/udf/symlink.c.

CVE-2014-9729
Published: 2015-08-31
The udf_read_inode function in fs/udf/inode.c in the Linux kernel before 3.18.2 does not ensure a certain data-structure size consistency, which allows local users to cause a denial of service (system crash) via a crafted UDF filesystem image.

CVE-2014-9730
Published: 2015-08-31
The udf_pc_to_char function in fs/udf/symlink.c in the Linux kernel before 3.18.2 relies on component lengths that are unused, which allows local users to cause a denial of service (system crash) via a crafted UDF filesystem image.

CVE-2014-9731
Published: 2015-08-31
The UDF filesystem implementation in the Linux kernel before 3.18.2 does not ensure that space is available for storing a symlink target's name along with a trailing \0 character, which allows local users to obtain sensitive information via a crafted filesystem image, related to fs/udf/symlink.c and...

CVE-2015-0942
Published: 2015-08-31
** REJECT ** DO NOT USE THIS CANDIDATE NUMBER. ConsultIDs: CVE-2015-6742, CVE-2015-6743, CVE-2015-6744, CVE-2015-6745, CVE-2015-6746, CVE-2015-6747. Reason: This candidate originally combined multiple issues that have different vulnerability types and other complex abstraction issues. Notes: All CV...

Dark Reading Radio
Archived Dark Reading Radio
Another Black Hat is in the books and Dark Reading was there. Join the editors as they share their top stories, biggest lessons, and best conversations from the premier security conference.