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Product Watch: New Tool Automatically Examines Suspicious Code In Memory

HBGary Responder Professional 2.0 analyzed malware behavior in the Operation Aurora in five minutes

HBGary today rolled out a new version of its malware analysis tool that speeds up the analysis of all code in memory -- including malware. The new HBGary Responder Professional 2.0 gets information on malware directly from memory rather than the operating system.

"Within five minutes, HBGary Responder Professional 2.0 analyzed the malware behavior in the Operation Aurora attack to identify registry keys, IP addresses, suspicious runtime behavior, and other critical data," says Greg Hoglund, founder and CEO of HBGary. An antivirus signature can take days or weeks to create, according to Hoglund.

The information lets security professionals determine the type of malware so they can lock down their policies or close holes in their networks or take other action. Responder Professional 2.0 generates reports on network, file, registry, and any suspicious activity.

Responder also comes with an add-on called Digital DNA, and supports Windows 7 memory analysis, as well as an upgraded user interface. HBGary Responder Professional 2.0 is priced at $9,000, plus a yearly subscription fee for the Digital DNA feature.

"Responder 2.0 integrates our sandbox technology, REcon, which automatically records all malware behavior -- both code and data -- down to the individual instruction," Hoglund says. "Because Responder combines binary analysis with volatile data in physical memory, symbol resolution is greatly enhanced, packers are easily defeated, and recovering decrypted data [is expedited]," he says.

Have a comment on this story? Please click "Discuss" below. If you'd like to contact Dark Reading's editors directly, send us a message. Kelly Jackson Higgins is Executive Editor at DarkReading.com. She is an award-winning veteran technology and business journalist with more than two decades of experience in reporting and editing for various publications, including Network Computing, Secure Enterprise ... View Full Bio

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