Attacks/Breaches
5/8/2014
02:45 PM
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Navy Nuclear Carrier Sysadmin Busted For Hacking Databases

Boredom cited as excuse for alleged hack campaign that may have compromised more than 30 government and private sites.

 

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10 Ways To Fight Digital Theft & Fraud
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A former US Navy systems administrator is part of a group that's been charged with hacking into 30 different sites and stealing sensitive information, while working in the nuclear reactor department aboard the USS Harry S. Truman aircraft carrier.

A 22-page indictment filed this week in US District Court in Oklahoma charged alleged members of "Team Digi7al" with hacking and stealing sensitive information from sites run by the likes of the Department of Homeland Security, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Harvard University, AT&T U-verse, and the Toronto Police Department.

According to the indictment, the gang comprised at least five people: Nicholas Paul Knight (a.k.a. Inertia, Logic, nickmc01, Solo, INER7IA), 27, a former enlisted Navy member and self-described "nuclear black hat" who handled publicity; Daniel Trenton Krueger (Thor, Orunu, Gambit, Chronius, 7hor, G4mbi7), 20, a network administration student at an Illinois community college who handled the technical side; and three minors -- based in Alabama, Georgia, and Louisiana -- who performed technical hacking work.

If a Team Digi7al Pastebin post is to be believed, however, the group counted eight members: Logic, 7hor, Shr00mi3, Sp3ctrum, Ichi, Kalypto, Th1nkT0k3n, and ThePonyWizard.

[Those serving in the military are twice as likely to fall victim to identity theft as the general public. How can we mitigate the risk? Read Defending Against Identity Theft In The Military.]

Regardless, the group drew the attention of the Naval Criminal Investigative Service (NCIS) after the gang's members began posting to Twitter (@TeamDigi7al) links to dumps of partial personal information pertaining to 20 Navy personnel.

"So heres that #Dump i was talking about. #US #Navy was our target," read a June 17, 2012, post. About a week later, the group also posted a link to the Navy's Smart Web Move site. Launched in June 2001, the web-based service was developed

Mathew Schwartz served as the InformationWeek information security reporter from 2010 until mid-2014. View Full Bio

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Charlie Babcock
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Charlie Babcock,
User Rank: Ninja
5/13/2014 | 6:58:16 PM
Rank amateurs
I'm glad were catching the rank amateurs, who boast of their exploits on Twitter. That's helpful to investigators. I wonder how we're doing against the true professionals.
Robert McDougal
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Robert McDougal,
User Rank: Ninja
5/12/2014 | 11:54:59 AM
Re: Lack of PII security
Many organizations do not employ (citing cost or low risk) internal IDS/IPS.  I would be surprised if the Navy was any different.  Unfortunately, it will take many more of these insider events before companies take the issue more seriously.
electronbee
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electronbee,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/9/2014 | 2:04:28 PM
Lack of PII security
The real reason for this was their sense of invincibility and not properly securing the network. Where is the IDS/IPS and the access control for the databases? Hello?
jwaters974
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jwaters974,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/9/2014 | 1:06:57 PM
Re: Insider Threat
It seems the gravity of the crime and the potential sentences do not match up.

A clearly bad "risk : reward ratio" must exist to discourage this behavior. Five year sentences are reduced for good behavior but the bribes for info and hacking could well be worth it - considering the deep pockets of our adversaries... both state and non state actors.

Hacking military assets is the most serious crime anyone in the military could do- certainly more perilous to the services than an individual throwing down their rifle and deserting in battle. (Not participating in battle out of fear vs. swinging an advantage to the enemy by exposing personnel and information, sharing classified access with MINORS who don't know sqat about national security and its consequences all because you are bored).

Playing "black hat" on an aircraft carrier - potentially compromising the safety of the crew (and in the wrong scenario - possibly many other military and civillian personnel) and billions of dollars of taxpayers assets

- in this cloaked world of secretive and ongoing wars (physical and cyber), we are always at war - and so this crime seems worthy of capital punishment. As is the case for desertion in battle.

I'm just saying......

 

 
Randy Naramore
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Randy Naramore,
User Rank: Ninja
5/8/2014 | 3:45:44 PM
Insider Threat
Insider threats are always the hardest to defend, your employees have to be able to do the job they are hired to do but so often they are the ones who post the biggest risk.
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