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W. Hord Tipton
W. Hord Tipton
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New Security Trend: Bring Your Own Attorney

BYOA is not a security joke anymore. There is clearly a need for a cybersecurity community that is well-versed in legal and ethical principles.

Additional research by the Ponemon Institute found:

-- 64% of respondents blamed malicious data breaches on lack of in-house expertise.

-- 47% blamed the breaches on lack of forensic capabilities.

-- Following a malicious breach, 52% say they increased spending on forensic capabilities by an average of 33%.

Unfortunately, the capability to sufficiently investigate cyber crimes has grown far beyond the Justice Department's capacity to manage. Although historically Justice has been overwhelmed with cases that have dwarfed the importance of cyber crime, the tide has turned. Cyber crime damage can no longer be categorized as a lesser priority, because the severity of damage resulting from cyber crime is surpassing that from traditional methods of crime.

In fact, the growth of cyber crime (in addition to traditional crimes, civil litigation, cyber-attacks for intelligence purposes, and more) is predicted to drive growth of the cyber forensics field over the next few years to at least three to four times faster than the growth of the global economy. This is a significant indicator of just how much collaboration the cyber and legal communities will demand.

So, how would the current relationship between the legal and cyber security professional communities be defined? And what is the role of legal personnel in today's security world and vice versa?

It is certainly something we are actively examining. In anticipation of the BYOA reality, my organization is forging closer relationships with organizations such as the American Bar Association, American Academy of Forensic Scientists, global governments and leading IT companies with the goal of fostering a greater understanding of the overlap of each others' worlds and how we can unite to strengthen our nation’s security posture.

After all, if you are a government cyber professional under investigation for a breach that occurred on your watch, you had better hope that the person defending you has an understanding of cyber principles. And if you are an attorney who calls a cyber security professional to the stand as an expert in a cyber criminal investigation, you’d better hope that your expert knows how to adequately educate an investigative team and to clearly communicate findings to a judge and jury.

There is clearly a need for a cyber security community that is well-versed in legal and ethical principles and a legal community that is well-versed in security principles. This is why (ISC)2 has made an investment in professionalizing digital forensics experts. For the sake of every chief information security officer, IT manager or business owner who is directly or indirectly tied to a security incident, let's continue to encourage collaboration and education among these two professional communities and to advance the skills of those who are on the front lines of digital investigation.

After all, if you have to "bring your own attorney," you’d better make certain he has a thorough understanding of your role and responsibilities, how they relate to your organization’s cyber practices, the enemies you face and the current threat environments.

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User Rank: Apprentice
9/12/2013 | 12:12:21 PM
re: New Security Trend: Bring Your Own Attorney
BYOA - LOL! Possible legal issues or not, BYOD is being used and BYOD policies are being signed by employees. Yes, you have to be careful, but the best secureity is not to have the data on the device. We use Tigertext messaging to send text, images and attachments, since they auto-delete after a set period of time and therefore don't remain on the phone/device which is more secure for everyone. Here is a link to a good BYOD policy that deals with this:
User Rank: Apprentice
8/29/2013 | 8:14:42 PM
re: New Security Trend: Bring Your Own Attorney
Given that we probably don't need any more lawyers, let's hope more folks pursue an education in digital forensics to meet the growing demand.
Lorna Garey
Lorna Garey,
User Rank: Ninja
8/29/2013 | 6:24:27 PM
re: New Security Trend: Bring Your Own Attorney
The jokes almost write themselves. Q: How many lawyers does it take to hunt down attribution for a breach? A: How many can you afford? Q: What do they call the new virus written by a lawyer? A: Sosumi
User Rank: Apprentice
8/29/2013 | 1:58:13 PM
re: New Security Trend: Bring Your Own Attorney
We hear that the hottest IT-related professions are data scientists and security technologists, but anecdotally I'm hearing a lot lately about another one: lawyers. One top CIO recently told me that most of his hires in the past year were lawyers and other compliance experts. And he wasn't happy about it.
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