Attacks/Breaches

British Spies Hit Anonymous With DDoS Attacks

British cyber agents attacked Anonymous chat rooms, leaked intelligence documents show.

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Lorna Garey
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Lorna Garey,
User Rank: Ninja
2/6/2014 | 1:04:59 PM
Re: Rules for thee but not for me
Governments regularly take actions that would be illegal for citizens, from imposing the death penalty to waging war to seizing assets to issuing currency. Offensive security as a tactic is on the horizon. Anyone who thinks governments won't -- and aren't -- using it now is naive.
Drew Conry-Murray
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50%
Drew Conry-Murray,
User Rank: Ninja
2/6/2014 | 9:57:30 AM
Re: Rules for thee but not for me
I agree, it makes the British government look silly. If you're going to punish people for launching DDoS attacks, it's hypocritical to launch one yourself. In addition, as a mechanism to stifle Anonymous activity or deter participation, it's absolutely useless.
Whoopty
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50%
Whoopty,
User Rank: Moderator
2/6/2014 | 9:14:56 AM
Freedom of Speech
British intelligence should be very careful with this sort of thing. It's dangerously close to infringing on human rights by denying the freedom of speech to those they attacked. They're in enough trouble with EUCHR due to Tempora. 
Mathew
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50%
Mathew,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/6/2014 | 4:26:49 AM
Re: Rules for thee but not for me
But it was 2011 and hackers were running amok! Something Had To Be Done.

But of course after they'd arrested a bunch of (mostly) teenagers, in retrospect the British government looks a bit silly -- for starters.
Thomas Claburn
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50%
Thomas Claburn,
User Rank: Ninja
2/5/2014 | 5:00:06 PM
Re: Rules for thee but not for me
The double standard here is troubling.
asksqn
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50%
asksqn,
User Rank: Ninja
2/5/2014 | 3:33:01 PM
Rules for thee but not for me
LOL so then since the British government has launched its own DDoS attack does that then mean it's OK for anyone else to do so?  Pardon me, but this smacks very much of the same thought process the US government has. It is childish and not a constructive use of resources.
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