Attacks/Breaches

10/14/2011
11:09 AM
50%
50%

Blackhole Crimeware Goes 'Prime Time'

New HP OfficeJet phishing emails peaked at around 36,000 per minute on Wednesday.

10 Massive Security Breaches
(click image for larger view)
Slideshow: 10 Massive Security Breaches
Attackers are increasingly using the Blackhole exploit kit in phishing campaigns: Most recently, one that poses as an email notification from an HP OfficeJet Printer has sent nearly 8 million emails thus far and uses 2,000 domains to serve up the malware.

Researchers at AppRiver say the trend demonstrates how Blackhole is following the pattern of popular crimeware kit Zeus and SpyEye. Blackhole traditionally has been used to infect legitimate websites for drive-by infection purposes. "This attack is unique because Blackhole added an email vector to its format and is flooding the Internet with similar methods used by Zeus, SpyEye, and others, essentially moving it into prime time," said Fred Touchette, senior security analyst for AppRiver. The attackers also have set up their own malicious links to infect users who click on URLs in the emails.

Blackhole, which previously had been marketed as a high-end crimeware tool, costing $1,500 for a one-year license, in May was unleashed for free in some underground forums. That has propelled more use of the toolkit.

Touchette said he first noticed the trend with a Steve Jobs-themed email campaign earlier this month in the wake of Jobs' death. "This is the first that I have personally noticed that leads email recipients to Blackhole websites. Before that, people using the Blackhole Kit relied on techniques such as SEO poisoning to lead victims to their sites," he said.

The OfficeJet email campaign, like other Blackhole attacks, is trolling for victims' online banking credentials. It works a lot like Zeus and others, using browser vulnerabilities on victims' machines and creating a backdoor for downloading and installing the Trojans. AppRiver's Touchette said Blackhole appears to favor Java and Adobe bugs.

"This most recent campaign is still trickling in, but will soon stall as most of its domains have been picked up and blacklisted by security professionals. At its peak yesterday, we were seeing malicious emails related to this campaign coming in at a rate of around 36,000 per minute," he said. "Links within those emails pointed toward approximately 2,000 separate domains that were hosting malicious code."

Read the rest of this article on Dark Reading.

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
New Mexico Man Sentenced on DDoS, Gun Charges
Dark Reading Staff 5/18/2018
Cracking 2FA: How It's Done and How to Stay Safe
Kelly Sheridan, Staff Editor, Dark Reading,  5/17/2018
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon Contest
Write a Caption, Win a Starbucks Card! Click Here
Latest Comment: Shhh!  They're watching... And you have a laptop?  
Current Issue
Flash Poll
[Strategic Security Report] Navigating the Threat Intelligence Maze
[Strategic Security Report] Navigating the Threat Intelligence Maze
Most enterprises are using threat intel services, but many are still figuring out how to use the data they're collecting. In this Dark Reading survey we give you a look at what they're doing today - and where they hope to go.
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2018-11403
PUBLISHED: 2018-05-24
DomainMod v4.09.03 has XSS via the assets/edit/account-owner.php oid parameter.
CVE-2018-11404
PUBLISHED: 2018-05-24
DomainMod v4.09.03 has XSS via the assets/edit/ssl-provider-account.php sslpaid parameter.
CVE-2018-11405
PUBLISHED: 2018-05-24
Kliqqi 2.0.2 has CSRF in admin/admin_users.php.
CVE-2018-11410
PUBLISHED: 2018-05-24
An issue was discovered in Liblouis 3.5.0. A invalid free in the compileRule function in compileTranslationTable.c allows remote attackers to cause a denial of service (application crash) or possibly have unspecified other impact.
CVE-2018-11399
PUBLISHED: 2018-05-24
SimpliSafe Original has Unencrypted Sensor Transmissions, which allows physically proximate attackers to obtain potentially sensitive information about the specific times when alarm-system events occur.