Application Security
7/28/2014
09:15 PM
Connect Directly
Google+
Twitter
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%

DHS-Funded 'SWAMP' Helps Scour Code For Bugs

Cloud-based platform offering free secure coding tools for developers in government, enterprises, academia, gaining commercial attention as well.

A US Department of Homeland Security-funded online portal that provides government agencies, enterprises, higher education, and independent developers a free platform for testing their code for security holes and vulnerabilities has quietly begun attracting commercial application security providers.

The so-called SWAMP (Software Assurance Marketplace) portal, which was developed under a $23.5 million DHS Science & Technology Directorate project aimed at helping developers more easily test their code for bugs that could be exploited by black-hat hackers, currently offers for free five open-source software assurance testing tools, as well as a cloud-based platform for running the software security scans and tests and aggregating the results. The static analysis testing tools are used to scour source code for bugs.

SWAMP, which is operated by security and software assurance experts from the University of Illinois-Champaign/Urbana, the University of Indiana, the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and the Morgridge Institute for Research in Madison, plans to open its doors to commercial software security services on the site so users can have an integrated platform for handling their secure coding tests.  

"There are several commercial providers who would like to participate in SWAMP," says Miron Livny, director and CTO of SWAMP. "Users could use SWAMP for [these services] if they reached a licensing agreement with the provider."

Veracode could be one of the first such commercial firms to join SWAMP. Chris Wysopal, CTO and co-founder of Veracode, says his company hopes to participate by offering its technology as an option for SWAMP users. While SWAMP offers static code analysis tools, Veracode could also provide its binary analysis service to its existing customers via the SWAMP portal, he says, as well as to new customers there.

"We don't see SWAMP as competitive, because it is really a marketplace where government agencies can be exposed to software assurance technologies to learn and select the best approaches for their needs," Wysopal tells us. "Veracode wants to participate as a technology available to SWAMP users so government agencies can see the strengths of our binary-analysis approach, which is different than the other technologies, which are source-code analysis-based."

SWAMP provides static analysis testing, which tests code without executing it. The goal of SWAMP is to provide a framework for developers to bring all of their various software assurance tools into one place, its organizers say. "The long-term vision is a network of software assurance facilities," says Livny, who is also a professor of computer sciences with the University of Wisconsin-Madison, chief technology officer with the Morgridge Institute, and director of the Center for High Throughput Computing.

"We are working on adding binary tools" in addition to the existing menu of static analysis tools on SWAMP, he says. SWAMP -- which first went live in February in a quiet launch -- last week unveiled a new, friendlier user interface.

Software vendors increasingly are under pressure to train developers to bake security into their code so that programs are less prone to security vulnerabilities that in turn are used to exploit victims. But smaller and more financially strapped organizations haven't always had the resources or know-how to test their software properly.

SWAMP hopes to bridge that gap."Can we make software assurance more effective and reduce the cost? That's our goal," says Livny.

SWAMP currently offers FindBugs, which finds Java bugs; PMD, which detects common programming flaws in Java, JavaScript, XML, and XSL applications; Cppcheck, which scans for bugs in the C and C++ languages; Clang Static Analyzer, which detects bugs in C, C++, and Objective-C programs; and GCC, a compiler for checking C and C++ code syntax.

There also are some 400 open-source software testing packages on SWAMP for secure coding tool developers to use in their tools. The portal offers a testing laboratory for tool developers, using the National Institute of Technology's Juliet Test Suite, which provides public domain software programs containing known vulnerabilities.

Kelly Jackson Higgins is Executive Editor at DarkReading.com. She is an award-winning veteran technology and business journalist with more than two decades of experience in reporting and editing for various publications, including Network Computing, Secure Enterprise ... View Full Bio

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
Marilyn Cohodas
50%
50%
Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Strategist
7/29/2014 | 9:32:32 AM
Re: DHS-Funded 'SWAMP' Helps Scour Code For Bugs
Awareness of the tools is a good first step. Awareness that software assurance is a critical issue that needs to be addressed by all developers in companies large and small is the bigger challenge, to be sure.
Kelly Jackson Higgins
50%
50%
Kelly Jackson Higgins,
User Rank: Strategist
7/29/2014 | 9:04:20 AM
Re: DHS-Funded 'SWAMP' Helps Scour Code For Bugs
So true. =) If the tools are free, easy to use online, all that's left is awareness about them. But I can see that still being an issue for smaller orgs/developers.
GonzSTL
50%
50%
GonzSTL,
User Rank: Ninja
7/29/2014 | 9:00:15 AM
Re: DHS-Funded 'SWAMP' Helps Scour Code For Bugs
Maybe it will make secure coding more mainstream. One thing it will potentially do is eliminate excuses.
Kelly Jackson Higgins
50%
50%
Kelly Jackson Higgins,
User Rank: Strategist
7/29/2014 | 8:54:31 AM
Re: DHS-Funded 'SWAMP' Helps Scour Code For Bugs
Given the strong push to write more secure code, this project indeed seems important. What I also think is cool about it is that it's going to include commercial scanning services, so users don't have to jump from one platform to another to scan their code. They can do it all from one platform, from what this promises. Maybe it will make secure coding more mainstream. 
GonzSTL
50%
50%
GonzSTL,
User Rank: Ninja
7/29/2014 | 8:35:14 AM
DHS-Funded 'SWAMP' Helps Scour Code For Bugs
This is an excellent service, especially for government agencies and small organizations who do not necessarily have the financial or human resouorces to help in the development of secure code. I understand that security has to be tightly integrated into any software development project, but the reality is that doing so requires resources that organizations do not always have. If more commercial providers participate in the effort, it becomes an even stronger platform for source code security testing. Hopefully, it will not lead to developer complacency, or carelessness by thinking that there is a safety net for developing poorly secured code. Ideally, they will have developed what they believe to be secure code, and this service will either prove it, or at the very least show them where the pitfalls are for future development efforts.
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Cartoon
Current Issue
Dark Reading Tech Digest, Dec. 19, 2014
Software-defined networking can be a net plus for security. The key: Work with the network team to implement gradually, test as you go, and take the opportunity to overhaul your security strategy.
Flash Poll
DevOps’ Impact on Application Security
DevOps’ Impact on Application Security
Managing the interdependency between software and infrastructure is a thorny challenge. Often, it’s a “developers are from Mars, systems engineers are from Venus” situation.
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2014-8142
Published: 2014-12-20
Use-after-free vulnerability in the process_nested_data function in ext/standard/var_unserializer.re in PHP before 5.4.36, 5.5.x before 5.5.20, and 5.6.x before 5.6.4 allows remote attackers to execute arbitrary code via a crafted unserialize call that leverages improper handling of duplicate keys w...

CVE-2013-4440
Published: 2014-12-19
Password Generator (aka Pwgen) before 2.07 generates weak non-tty passwords, which makes it easier for context-dependent attackers to guess the password via a brute-force attack.

CVE-2013-4442
Published: 2014-12-19
Password Generator (aka Pwgen) before 2.07 uses weak pseudo generated numbers when /dev/urandom is unavailable, which makes it easier for context-dependent attackers to guess the numbers.

CVE-2013-7401
Published: 2014-12-19
The parse_request function in request.c in c-icap 0.2.x allows remote attackers to cause a denial of service (crash) via a URI without a " " or "?" character in an ICAP request, as demonstrated by use of the OPTIONS method.

CVE-2014-2026
Published: 2014-12-19
Cross-site scripting (XSS) vulnerability in the search functionality in United Planet Intrexx Professional before 5.2 Online Update 0905 and 6.x before 6.0 Online Update 10 allows remote attackers to inject arbitrary web script or HTML via the request parameter.

Best of the Web
Dark Reading Radio
Archived Dark Reading Radio
Join us Wednesday, Dec. 17 at 1 p.m. Eastern Time to hear what employers are really looking for in a chief information security officer -- it may not be what you think.