Analytics

5/23/2018
10:00 AM
Steve Zurier
Steve Zurier
Slideshows
Connect Directly
Twitter
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%

6 Steps for Applying Data Science to Security

Two experts share their data science know-how in a tutorial focusing on internal DNS query analysis.
Previous
1 of 7
Next

Image Source: Ryzhi via Shutterstock

Image Source: Ryzhi via Shutterstock

Security practitioners are being told that they have to get smarter about how they use data. The problem is that many data scientists are lost in their world of math and algorithms and don’t always explain the value they bring from a business perspective.

Dr. Kenneth Sanford, analytics architect and sales engineering lead at Dataiku, says security pros have to work more closely with data scientists to understand what the business is trying to accomplish. For example, is compliance the goal? Or is the company looking to determine what it might cost if they experienced a ransomware attack?

"It’s really important to define the business problem," Sanford says. "Something like what downtime would cost the business, or what the monetary fine would be if the company were out of compliance."

Bob Rudis, chief data scientist at Rapid7, adds that companies need to take a step back and look at their processes and decide what could be done better via data science.

"Companies need to ask themselves how the security problem is associated with the business problem," Rudis says.

Sanford and Rudis created a six-step process for how to build a model to analyze internal DNS queries – the goal of which would be to reduce or eliminate malicious code from the queries. 

 

Steve Zurier has more than 30 years of journalism and publishing experience, most of the last 24 of which were spent covering networking and security technology. Steve is based in Columbia, Md. View Full Bio

Previous
1 of 7
Next
Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
Election Websites, Back-End Systems Most at Risk of Cyberattack in Midterms
Kelly Jackson Higgins, Executive Editor at Dark Reading,  8/14/2018
Intel Reveals New Spectre-Like Vulnerability
Curtis Franklin Jr., Senior Editor at Dark Reading,  8/15/2018
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon Contest
Current Issue
Flash Poll
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2018-13435
PUBLISHED: 2018-08-16
** DISPUTED ** An issue was discovered in the LINE jp.naver.line application 8.8.0 for iOS. The Passcode feature allows authentication bypass via runtime manipulation that forces a certain method to disable passcode authentication. NOTE: the vendor indicates that this is not an attack of interest w...
CVE-2018-13446
PUBLISHED: 2018-08-16
** DISPUTED ** An issue was discovered in the LINE jp.naver.line application 8.8.1 for Android. The Passcode feature allows authentication bypass via runtime manipulation that forces a certain method's return value to true. In other words, an attacker could authenticate with an arbitrary passcode. ...
CVE-2018-14567
PUBLISHED: 2018-08-16
libxml2 2.9.8, if --with-lzma is used, allows remote attackers to cause a denial of service (infinite loop) via a crafted XML file that triggers LZMA_MEMLIMIT_ERROR, as demonstrated by xmllint, a different vulnerability than CVE-2015-8035 and CVE-2018-9251.
CVE-2018-15122
PUBLISHED: 2018-08-16
An issue found in Progress Telerik JustAssembly through 2018.1.323.2 and JustDecompile through 2018.2.605.0 makes it possible to execute code by decompiling a compiled .NET object (such as DLL or EXE) with an embedded resource file by clicking on the resource.
CVE-2018-11509
PUBLISHED: 2018-08-16
ASUSTOR ADM 3.1.0.RFQ3 uses the same default root:admin username and password as it does for the NAS itself for applications that are installed from the online repository. This may allow an attacker to login and upload a webshell.