Application Security

11/3/2014
10:00 AM
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10 Cool Security Tools Open-Sourced By The Internet's Biggest Innovators

Google, Facebook, Netflix, and others have all offered up tools they've developed in-house to the community at large.
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As today's Internet giants break the barrier for speed and scale of development of systems, their teams are increasingly tasked with building home-brewed security systems that can help them develop and manage their systems securely without missing a beat. In the end, the entire security community is benefitting from a lot of these investments, as many of these firms make these tools available through open-source projects. Over the past few years, some very useful tools have come from the security and engineering teams at Facebook, Twitter, Google, Netflix, Etsy, and even AOL.

Security Monkey
Built by Netflix three years ago, Security Monkey is a monitoring and security analysis tool for Amazon Web Services configurations. It includes components for monitoring various AWS account components, developing, and executing actions based on policy rules, notifying users when audit rules are triggered and storing configuration histories for forensic and audit purposes.

(Image: Netflix)

Built by Netflix three years ago, Security Monkey is a monitoring and security analysis tool for Amazon Web Services configurations. It includes components for monitoring various AWS account components, developing, and executing actions based on policy rules, notifying users when audit rules are triggered and storing configuration histories for forensic and audit purposes.

(Image: Netflix)

 

Ericka Chickowski specializes in coverage of information technology and business innovation. She has focused on information security for the better part of a decade and regularly writes about the security industry as a contributor to Dark Reading.  View Full Bio

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Marilyn Cohodas
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Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Strategist
11/4/2014 | 10:49:12 AM
Solid collection of open source tools> what's your favorite?
Great job, Ericka on putting this together. Wondering which ones Dark Reading commnunity members use and what are their favorites. Share your thoughts in the comments. 
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