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3/13/2020
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What Cybersecurity Pros Really Think About Artificial Intelligence

While there's a ton of unbounded optimism from vendor marketing and consultant types, practitioners are still reserving a lot of judgment.
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The cybersecurity industry has been targeted by technology and business leaders as one of the top advanced use cases for artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning (ML) in the enterprise today. According to the latest studies, AI technology in cybersecurity is poised to grow over 23% annually through the second half of the decade. That'll have the cybersecurity AI market growing from $8.8 billion last year to $38.2 billion by 2026.

The question seasoned cybersecurity veterans are asking themselves right now is, "How much does AI really help security postures and security operations?" There's a ton of unbounded optimism from the vendor marketing and consultant types, but practitioners are still reserving a lot of judgment. As we piece together the surveys of cybersecurity industry perceptions, it becomes clear that a big part of the industry's evolution in the 2020s will be how it can effectively balance AI and human intelligence. Here's what the data shows at the moment.

 

Ericka Chickowski specializes in coverage of information technology and business innovation. She has focused on information security for the better part of a decade and regularly writes about the security industry as a contributor to Dark Reading.  View Full Bio

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rstatsinger
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rstatsinger,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/18/2020 | 5:20:24 PM
AI sweetspot: lots of date
Remember that AI thrives on large datasets against which the AI can be trained - or can self-organize - to detect patterns and draw correct inferences. This implies that the most natural fit for AI in cybersecurity is in perimeter defense - WAFs, NGWAFs, IDSs, etc - which are constantly bombarded with traffic from both the 'good guys' and the 'bad guys'. Using AI to help distinguish which is which - and to present humans with business decision assistance - is probably the lowest hanging fruit for AI in our business.
Waltsz61@gmail.com
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[email protected],
User Rank: Apprentice
4/15/2020 | 10:22:02 AM
AI needs network and detailed end point dat
AI will always work if given the raw network and endpoint data that the process needs.  Without data, AI can not work.

99% of organizations have no idea of what's on their network, that includes users, endpoints, software and hardware and end point behavior.

what do you expect AI to analyze, you might as well use a crystal ball.  That works without data and your results will be better.

Walt

cleararmor.com

9083105916

 
boholuxe
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boholuxe,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/20/2020 | 5:38:33 AM
Overestimated
I may be wrong but in my opinion artificial intelligence is a little bit overestimasted
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