Dark Reading is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

Vulnerabilities / Threats

12/31/2007
05:00 AM
50%
50%

Secure Resolutions

Skip the diet and spend more time in the lab

3:00 PM -- It’s time for New Year’s resolutions, something I’ve not been very good at in the past. So rather than listing the mainstream resolutions to lose weight, watch less television, or quit some bad habit, I’ve decided to put together three resolutions that can help other IT security professionals (including myself) become better at what we do.

  1. Spend more time in the lab. 2007 is probably the year that I've spent the least time testing in the lab. With so many projects going on, it's been difficult to simply test out new tools and attack methods to see first-hand how they work. Whether your lab merely runs different operating systems within VMware, or handles something more complex such as multiple physical machines, switches, and routers, make time to get your hands dirty.
  2. Read more quality, less quantity. If your list of blog, or RSS, feeds has become unwieldy like mine, it's time to do some cleanup. Blogs may vary in quality, but the biggest issue is those that just don't seem to end. Like most IT security professionals, I'm a busy guy being pulled in many directions. I can't sit down and read blog entries that are practically the size of a small feature article in a magazine. I use Google Reader to organize blogs into categories such as daily, Web hacking, forensics, and someday (those that are too long to read daily).
  3. Develop a new skill or hone an old one. For me, I usually try to work on a couple of new skills each year. My current focus is reverse engineering and exploit development, which I'm finding to be quite time-consuming yet rewarding. New skills don't have to be something completely new to you. It could be honing a skill that you haven't had time to fully develop, or maybe something you used to be an expert in but haven't been able to keep up with as the technology has changed. If you're lucky, the skill could be something that could develop into a new area of interest and lead to a better job opportunity.

Resolutions don't have to be a long list, and they don't have to be life-changing. Start with the basics to get you to where you want to be. IT security is an ever-changing field, and if you sit around doing nothing, you'll quickly get passed by. Good luck and Happy New Year.

– John H. Sawyer is a security geek on the IT Security Team at the University of Florida. He enjoys taking long war walks on the beach and riding pwnies. When he's not fighting flaming, malware-infested machines or performing autopsies on blitzed boxes, he can usually be found hanging with his family, bouncing a baby on one knee and balancing a laptop on the other. Special to Dark Reading

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
Firms Improve Threat Detection but Face Increasingly Disruptive Attacks
Robert Lemos, Contributing Writer,  2/20/2020
Ransomware Damage Hit $11.5B in 2019
Dark Reading Staff 2/20/2020
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon
Current Issue
6 Emerging Cyber Threats That Enterprises Face in 2020
This Tech Digest gives an in-depth look at six emerging cyber threats that enterprises could face in 2020. Download your copy today!
Flash Poll
How Enterprises Are Developing and Maintaining Secure Applications
How Enterprises Are Developing and Maintaining Secure Applications
The concept of application security is well known, but application security testing and remediation processes remain unbalanced. Most organizations are confident in their approach to AppSec, although others seem to have no approach at all. Read this report to find out more.
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2019-18238
PUBLISHED: 2020-02-26
Moxa ioLogik 2542-HSPA Series Controllers and IOs, and IOxpress Configuration Utility ioLogik 2500 series firmware, Version 3.0 or lower IOxpress configuration utility, Version 2.3.0 or lower. Sensitive information is stored in configuration files without encryption, which may allow an attacker to a...
CVE-2019-17274
PUBLISHED: 2020-02-26
NetApp FAS 8300/8700 and AFF A400 Baseboard Management Controller (BMC) firmware versions 13.x prior to 13.1P1 were shipped with a default account enabled that could allow unauthorized arbitrary command execution via local access.
CVE-2019-17275
PUBLISHED: 2020-02-26
OnCommand Cloud Manager versions prior to 3.8.0 are susceptible to arbitrary code execution by remote attackers.
CVE-2020-3169
PUBLISHED: 2020-02-26
A vulnerability in the CLI of Cisco FXOS Software could allow an authenticated, local attacker to execute arbitrary commands on the underlying Linux operating system with a privilege level of root on an affected device. The vulnerability is due to insufficient validation of arguments passed to a spe...
CVE-2020-3170
PUBLISHED: 2020-02-26
A vulnerability in the NX-API feature of Cisco NX-OS Software could allow an unauthenticated, remote attacker to cause an NX-API system process to unexpectedly restart. The vulnerability is due to incorrect validation of the HTTP header of a request that is sent to the NX-API. An attacker could expl...