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Vulnerabilities / Threats

8/10/2011
09:22 AM
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Google Researcher Dissects Sophos Antivirus Software

AV product vendors don't provide sufficient technical details on how their products work, researcher says at Black Hat USA.

Black Hat
A security researcher at Black Hat USA, a UBM TechWeb event in Las Vegas, last week shared his findings from reverse-engineering Sophos' core antivirus engine software in an effort to uncover more details on just how the product actually works.

Google researcher Tavis Ormandy, who conducted the research independently, performed an in-depth analysis of Sophos' core AV engine in Sophos Antivirus 9.5 for Windows. Ormandy's premise for his research was that when AV firms falsely or inadequately advertise their features in product specifications, it misleads customers.

"AV vendors won't explain what it is they do," he said. They don't publish technical specifications, so there's no way to really understand or test their claims, he said.

And poorly implemented features in AV software expand the attack surface, according to Ormandy, who pointed out such weaknesses in the Sophos engine. These are not traditional vulnerabilities, but instead how Sophos designed the code and implemented its features, he said.

Among the flaws in the design were some in the product's signatures, which Ormandy described as weak and relying heavily on CRC32 and "matching irrelevant or dead-code sequences." He also scrutinized Sophos' buffer overflow protection system (BOPS) in its host-intrusion prevention system, which he said works only in earlier Windows versions (prior to Vista) and employs weak runtime exploit mitigation, as well as weak crypto to protect it from attackers.

Overall, Sophos employs a weak encryption scheme within its products that is dated and could ultimately be beaten, he said. "Sophos tried to hide the key within the product [with this encryption scheme]," Ormandy said. "That reduces it to an obfuscation scheme. Sophos uses obfuscation where real cryptography could work."

Among the other features Ormandy studied in Sophos' product were native code emulation, unpackers, and "genes and genotypes." He concluded that its native code emulation could be bypassed or detected by an attacker, and its native unpackers could be gamed by bypassing the blacklisting feature.

Read the rest of this article on Dark Reading.

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