Dark Reading is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

Attacks/Breaches

1/23/2019
04:15 PM
50%
50%

Aging PCs Running Out-of-Date Software Bring Security Worries

Age is an issue with application languages and frameworks, too.

More than half of the software running on PCs around the world is outdated, with millions of users still logging into computers running Windows Vista and XP. That's just some of the information to come from a new report on PC software and the risks posed to security.

The "Avast 2019 PC Trends Report" is based on anonymized data from 163 million computers running Avast and AVG security software. It presents information on both the hardware and software running the world's business and personal applications — and the picture it paints is of an infrastructure growing older with each passing year.

In fact, the average age of a desktop PC is 6 years old, up from 5.5 years old in 2017. That's compared with less than a three-year average life span for a smartphone. Age continues to be an issue with application languages and frameworks, too. According to the report's authors, "Our report shows that the number of installed tools and frameworks is higher than 'real' apps, such as Office or Skype. In some cases, these aren't being kept up-to-date by the user or the vendor."

Read more here.

Dark Reading's Quick Hits delivers a brief synopsis and summary of the significance of breaking news events. For more information from the original source of the news item, please follow the link provided in this article. View Full Bio
 

Recommended Reading:

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Threaded  |  Newest First  |  Oldest First
REISEN1955
50%
50%
REISEN1955,
User Rank: Ninja
1/24/2019 | 6:48:02 AM
No surprise
As a private consultant a few years ago, before moving to Georgia, I had many clients running relatively old (3 years or so) old sysems.  It ws my job, of course, to advocate for newer systems and in this I was pretty good, keeping an eye on budgets.  Medical offices were the hardest - they were tight with dollars perhaps because a $20,000 piece of equipment hurts so that is the way they think of everything.  501C3 were also hard but that was a real budget concern.  A few have almos gone under since I left for Georgia.  The trick was if not totally new, to go back a year or so.  Dell had a great refurb site, still exists, for systems off lease and a year old.  That is not too bad and helped the budgets.  Going totally NEW can be a dollar breaker.  I wish it were otherwise.  I had good backup and restore procedures though and defeated ransomware on a few occasions through catalog backups and home based off-site systems of my own.  (30 computers in the basement).  

 

Update - generally it was always a question of $$ as opposed to everything IS WORKING - why do we need to replace?  Tech answers are not understood.  
Commentary
How SolarWinds Busted Up Our Assumptions About Code Signing
Dr. Jethro Beekman, Technical Director,  3/3/2021
News
'ObliqueRAT' Now Hides Behind Images on Compromised Websites
Jai Vijayan, Contributing Writer,  3/2/2021
News
Attackers Turn Struggling Software Projects Into Trojan Horses
Robert Lemos, Contributing Writer,  2/26/2021
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon Contest
Current Issue
2021 Top Enterprise IT Trends
We've identified the key trends that are poised to impact the IT landscape in 2021. Find out why they're important and how they will affect you today!
Flash Poll
How Enterprises are Developing Secure Applications
How Enterprises are Developing Secure Applications
Recent breaches of third-party apps are driving many organizations to think harder about the security of their off-the-shelf software as they continue to move left in secure software development practices.
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2021-21510
PUBLISHED: 2021-03-08
Dell iDRAC8 versions prior to 2.75.100.75 contain a host header injection vulnerability. A remote unauthenticated attacker may potentially exploit this vulnerability by injecting arbitrary ‘Host’ header values to poison a web-cache or trigger redirections.
CVE-2020-27575
PUBLISHED: 2021-03-08
Maxum Rumpus 8.2.13 and 8.2.14 is affected by a command injection vulnerability. The web administration contains functionality in which administrators are able to manage users. The edit users form contains a parameter vulnerable to command injection due to insufficient validation.
CVE-2020-27576
PUBLISHED: 2021-03-08
Maxum Rumpus 8.2.13 and 8.2.14 is affected by cross-site scripting (XSS). Users are able to create folders in the web application. The folder name is insufficiently validated resulting in a stored cross-site scripting vulnerability.
CVE-2020-27838
PUBLISHED: 2021-03-08
A flaw was found in keycloak in versions prior to 13.0.0. The client registration endpoint allows fetching information about PUBLIC clients (like client secret) without authentication which could be an issue if the same PUBLIC client changed to CONFIDENTIAL later. The highest threat from this vulner...
CVE-2021-21503
PUBLISHED: 2021-03-08
PowerScale OneFS 8.1.2,8.2.2 and 9.1.0 contains an improper input sanitization issue in a command. The Compadmin user could potentially exploit this vulnerability, leading to potential privileges escalation.