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Vulnerabilities / Threats

11/9/2018
01:00 PM

What You Should Know About Grayware (and What to Do About It)

Grayware is a tricky security problem, but there are steps you can take to defend your organization when you recognize the risk.
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Grayware Makes for More Malicious Noise
Security professionals often complain about the sheer amount of data they, and their systems, must sort through in order to find attacks and exploits. Grayware makes this problem worse by adding potential unwanted applications and their data to the overall mix.
The first way grayware adds to the 'noise' is from simple additional software. The presence of more applications means more applications that have to be analyzed, deployed, configured, and managed. Then comes more noise.
Grayware tends to exist to serve ads, gather data, or both. All of these will require network traffic with a command-and-control (C&C) server somewhere outside the organization - traffic that must be sniffed and analyzed. That makes the overall data volume great, which makes the noise floor higher and creates clutter that must be cut through before actual malicious traffic can be found. Even if the grayware isn't doing anything malicious on its own, its presence and activity make it easier for malware to hide.
(Image: 5187396 VIA Pixabay)

Grayware Makes for More Malicious Noise

Security professionals often complain about the sheer amount of data they, and their systems, must sort through in order to find attacks and exploits. Grayware makes this problem worse by adding potential unwanted applications and their data to the overall mix.

The first way grayware adds to the "noise" is from simple additional software. The presence of more applications means more applications that have to be analyzed, deployed, configured, and managed. Then comes more noise.

Grayware tends to exist to serve ads, gather data, or both. All of these will require network traffic with a command-and-control (C&C) server somewhere outside the organization traffic that must be sniffed and analyzed. That makes the overall data volume great, which makes the noise floor higher and creates clutter that must be cut through before actual malicious traffic can be found. Even if the grayware isn't doing anything malicious on its own, its presence and activity make it easier for malware to hide.

(Image: 5187396 VIA Pixabay)

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peternjohnson
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peternjohnson,
User Rank: Strategist
12/4/2018 | 9:16:04 AM
Horrible slideshow format negates taking anything serious from darkreading!
These "slideshows" are a horiible waste of time and energy, I mean what is this, facebook clickbait???

How can we download a PDF or something that is useful?

 
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