Vulnerabilities / Threats

7/14/2016
02:30 PM
Sean Martin
Sean Martin
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What SMBs Need To Know About Security But Are Afraid To Ask

A comprehensive set of new payment protection resources from the PCI Security Standards Council aims to help small- and medium-sized businesses make security a priority.
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Image Source: imsmartin/PCI Council

Image Source: imsmartin/PCI Council

After more than 10 years making a name for itself as delivering a globally recognized industry standard, the PCI Security Standards Council (PCI SSC) recently launched a new set of payment protection resources for small businesses which has been appropriately called PCI Payment Protection Resources for Small Merchants. This is a timely launch, for sure, given the increased awareness and focus on third party vendor risk and the realities behind small- to mid-sized business security postures.

Furthering this point, the PCI SSC noted in a recent press release that small businesses around the world are increasingly at risk for payment data theft — and nearly half of cyberattacks worldwide in 2015 were against small businesses with fewer than 250 workers.

In response to this trend, and as a means to help small- to mid-sized business merchants protect their own data – as well as their customers’ data – the PCI SSC Small Merchant Taskforce developed the new set of payment protection resources.

Troy Leach, Chief Technology Officer for the PCI SSC, captures the essence of this delivery quite well by saying: “Small merchants often rely on their banks and their technology vendors for information on what’s needed to take card payments. For security to become a priority, it has to be part of that dialogue.”

 

Sean Martin is an information security veteran of nearly 25 years and a four-term CISSP with articles published globally covering security management, cloud computing, enterprise mobility, governance, risk, and compliance—with a focus on specialized industries such as ... View Full Bio

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3Dmerchant
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3Dmerchant,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/17/2016 | 10:41:14 AM
Good resource, but falls a little short
Note: Documents target SMALL merchants only, and includes some great resources. If looking for guidance, should comparative risk identify non-PCI compliant practices on nearly every slide? A chief complaint is risk profiles including "hard copy data, for example on paper receipts..." and "pin entry devices that are not PCI Compliant". To include that, maybe the report should be include color coding for non-PCI compliant elements (credit card numbers on receipts, pin entry devices),

Shortcomings:
  • What's not illustrated? What a P2PE solution looks like.
  • Type 14 Virtual Terminal Protections, for example, should add: Install browser, software, firewall patches; Use an encrypted Keypad.
  • Terminology: "Semi-integrated" is commonly being used by companies selling POS solutions. It's not in the Glossary, nor readily identifiable in the Payment system types at a glance. Too keep it simple for small businesses, it needs to be easier to figure out what they're comparing in real world.
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