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Vulnerabilities / Threats

1/16/2015
10:15 AM
Peter Zavlaris
Peter Zavlaris
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The Truth About Malvertising

Malvertising accounts for huge amounts of cyberfraud and identity theft. Yet there is still no consensus on who is responsible for addressing these threats.

(Source: RiskIQ Global Network)
(Source: RiskIQ Global Network)

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PZav
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PZav,
User Rank: Author
1/21/2015 | 7:48:35 PM
Re: who is responsible? onus on advertisers and publishers
The reason ISPs won't get involved is because its a slippery slope for them. If they created controls for something like bad adverstisements, then media outlets would start putting pressure on them to curb pirating. Its the same issue for search engines. Plus there is the whole privacy can of worms as well. How closely do they have to look at our traffic to setup meaningful controls? As soon as they're viewed as anything more than a transit system, they begin to take on a lot more responsibility. Its too much of a liability.  
Marilyn Cohodas
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Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Strategist
1/21/2015 | 8:48:34 AM
Re: who is responsible? onus on advertisers and publishers
It's hard to know who should take the lead for malvertising prevention -- or the blame for the problem in the first place. Yes, it's a consumer problem via personal computers. But so is a  lot of garden variety malware. Maybe ISPs should provide consumers with better controls ?
Chris Weltzien
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Chris Weltzien,
User Rank: Author
1/20/2015 | 5:31:59 PM
Re: who is responsible? onus on advertisers and publishers
This problem has been brewing for a while. We saw it back in 2007 at Exploit Prevention Labs when it was just starting to surface and when we uncovered some some malicious Google Ads campaigns USA Today ran an article on it. (can't link to it in comments)  More recently the Senate had hearings on it in the spring of 2014, where ad networks were called out for ignoring the problem. If you are looking to protect yourself AVG's LinkScanner is a real-time client side solution, if you are looking for someone to take responsibility I wouldn't hold your breath. 
PZav
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50%
PZav,
User Rank: Author
1/20/2015 | 4:02:55 PM
Re: who is responsible? onus on advertisers and publishers
History is on your side Marilyn! I do wonder if this is recognized as a consumer facing problem, if brands will take it more seriously though. It seemed like with the POS breaches that the banks were really the ones left holding the bag. But malvertising reaches personal computers. Time will tell! Thanks for the comment.
Marilyn Cohodas
100%
0%
Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Strategist
1/20/2015 | 9:04:17 AM
Re: who is responsible? onus on advertisers and publishers
I wouldn't hold my breath for advertisers and publishers to be proactive about malvertising -- at least not any time soon. Retailers have certainly been a major target of attacks and look at their track record at getting ahead of the hackers...
PZav
50%
50%
PZav,
User Rank: Author
1/19/2015 | 12:15:47 PM
Re: who is responsible?
Maybe one of the biggest concerns is the harm malvertising will cause to the Internet economy, which is fueled by digital advertising. 
macker490
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50%
macker490,
User Rank: Ninja
1/17/2015 | 9:51:31 AM
who is responsible?
until the laws regarding product liability are changed the system owner is responsible.

I am considering running my browser in a "NamedSpace" such as "firejail"  -- as my response to this question.

 
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