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Vulnerabilities / Threats

3/15/2017
12:00 PM
Kelly Sheridan
Kelly Sheridan
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The 6 Riskiest Social Media Habits to Avoid at Work

Cybercriminals are turning to Facebook, Twitter and other platforms to launch attacks via employee behavior that could be putting your business at risk.
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Oversharing sensitive information
Most people don't think twice about the personal information they make publicly available. Social media accounts are 'a treasure trove' of birthdates, education histories, and family relations. All of this data is commonly used in security checks for password recovery forms, says Laliberte.
'An attacker trying to gain access to your corporate email account could easily guess the password recovery questions,' he explains, citing 'Who was your best friend growing up?' and 'What city were you born in?' as common examples. Both answers could be found in public profiles on Facebook or LinkedIn.
Blair explains how both executives and privileged users, who have access to sensitive information on clients and partners, are at high risk of being targeted. Administrators are also key targets because they manage executive accounts and could be hackers' gateways into an organization. While these privileged users are often the most security savvy, he says, they are also at greatest risk.
Oversharing may also lead to physical security risks, a concern especially relevant to high-ranking company officials, says Blair. Threat actors can easily determine someone's location from a Facebook post or tweet.
'If you're the executive of a big company, that's opening yourself up to an incredible amount of risk,' he cautions.
(Image: Tomek_Pa via Shutterstock)

Oversharing sensitive information

Most people don't think twice about the personal information they make publicly available. Social media accounts are "a treasure trove" of birthdates, education histories, and family relations. All of this data is commonly used in security checks for password recovery forms, says Laliberte.

"An attacker trying to gain access to your corporate email account could easily guess the password recovery questions," he explains, citing "Who was your best friend growing up?" and "What city were you born in?" as common examples. Both answers could be found in public profiles on Facebook or LinkedIn.

Blair explains how both executives and privileged users, who have access to sensitive information on clients and partners, are at high risk of being targeted. Administrators are also key targets because they manage executive accounts and could be hackers' gateways into an organization. While these privileged users are often the most security savvy, he says, they are also at greatest risk.

Oversharing may also lead to physical security risks, a concern especially relevant to high-ranking company officials, says Blair. Threat actors can easily determine someone's location from a Facebook post or tweet.

"If you're the executive of a big company, that's opening yourself up to an incredible amount of risk," he cautions.

(Image: Tomek_Pa via Shutterstock)

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