Dark Reading is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

Vulnerabilities / Threats

7/18/2016
11:19 AM
Rutrell Yasin
Rutrell Yasin
Slideshows
Connect Directly
Twitter
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%

Locking Down Windows 10: 6 New Features

The latest version of Windows includes expanded identity and access controls, advanced Bitlocker encryption, and new malware protections.
Previous
1 of 7
Next

For enterprises the number one reason to upgrade to Windows 10 is improved security, but the critical enhancements that rely on hardware protection will be difficult to adopt until you buy new PCs, says Simon Crosby, co-founder and CTO of Bromium, a Microsoft partner that delivers hardware enforced security to deployed Windows endpoints.

Windows 10 is designed to protect against known and emerging security threats across the spectrum of attack vectors, according to Microsoft. As a result, Microsoft has laid out three broad categories of security work that has been incorporated into Windows 10: identity and access control features, information protection, and malware resistance.

Identity and access control features have been expanded to simplify and enhance user authentication security, and features that utilize virtualization-based security to protect the Windows authentication subsystems and users’ credentials. Information protection focuses on guarding information at rest, in use, and in transit offering advanced encryption. Meanwhile, malware resistance includes architectural changes aimed at isolating critical systems and security components from threats.

“Microsoft has adopted a device-centric view of security now,” Crosby says. Hardware-based security is a fundamental component of all the three categories – identity and access control, information protection and malware resistance.  “Microsoft is increasingly moving down the path using additional hardware features on a device to do security.”  For instance, Microsoft provides hardware-assisted security technologies in the new feature called Device Guard, which ensures devices are booted securely, whitelists kernel code and offers credential protection and biometric authentication, Crosby notes.

“The primary benefit of Windows 10 is security, but few organizations can contemplate the complex and labor-intensive task of upgrading existing PCs or shoulder the cost of a hardware refresh just to protect credentials and benefit from kernel whitelisting,” according to a Bromium whitepaper. This means the adoption of Windows 10 might be stalled pending a hardware refresh with OEM configurations for Secure Boot and Windows 10 with virtualization-based security. 

Here are seven security features that Microsoft says makes Windows 10 the most secure version of Windows ever.

 

Rutrell Yasin has more than 30 years of experience writing about the application of information technology in business and government. View Full Bio
 

Recommended Reading:

Previous
1 of 7
Next
Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Threaded  |  Newest First  |  Oldest First
COVID-19: Latest Security News & Commentary
Dark Reading Staff 9/21/2020
Hacking Yourself: Marie Moe and Pacemaker Security
Gary McGraw Ph.D., Co-founder Berryville Institute of Machine Learning,  9/21/2020
Cybersecurity Bounces Back, but Talent Still Absent
Simone Petrella, Chief Executive Officer, CyberVista,  9/16/2020
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon
Current Issue
Special Report: Computing's New Normal
This special report examines how IT security organizations have adapted to the "new normal" of computing and what the long-term effects will be. Read it and get a unique set of perspectives on issues ranging from new threats & vulnerabilities as a result of remote working to how enterprise security strategy will be affected long term.
Flash Poll
How IT Security Organizations are Attacking the Cybersecurity Problem
How IT Security Organizations are Attacking the Cybersecurity Problem
The COVID-19 pandemic turned the world -- and enterprise computing -- on end. Here's a look at how cybersecurity teams are retrenching their defense strategies, rebuilding their teams, and selecting new technologies to stop the oncoming rise of online attacks.
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2020-25826
PUBLISHED: 2020-09-23
PingID Integration for Windows Login before 2.4.2 allows local users to gain privileges by modifying CefSharp.BrowserSubprocess.exe.
CVE-2020-25821
PUBLISHED: 2020-09-23
** UNSUPPORTED WHEN ASSIGNED ** peg-markdown 0.4.14 has a NULL pointer dereference in process_raw_blocks in markdown_lib.c. NOTE: This vulnerability only affects products that are no longer supported by the maintainer.
CVE-2020-3130
PUBLISHED: 2020-09-23
A vulnerability in the web management interface of Cisco Unity Connection could allow an authenticated remote attacker to overwrite files on the underlying filesystem. The vulnerability is due to insufficient input validation. An attacker could exploit this vulnerability by sending a crafted HTTP re...
CVE-2020-3133
PUBLISHED: 2020-09-23
A vulnerability in the email message scanning of Cisco AsyncOS Software for Cisco Email Security Appliance (ESA) could allow an unauthenticated, remote attacker to bypass configured filters on the device. The vulnerability is due to improper validation of incoming emails. An attacker could exploit t...
CVE-2020-3135
PUBLISHED: 2020-09-23
A vulnerability in the web-based management interface of Cisco Unified Communications Manager (UCM) could allow an unauthenticated, remote attacker to conduct a cross-site request forgery (CSRF) attack on an affected device. The vulnerability is due to insufficient CSRF protections for the web-based...