Dark Reading is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

Vulnerabilities / Threats

7/18/2016
11:19 AM
Rutrell Yasin
Rutrell Yasin
Slideshows
Connect Directly
Twitter
RSS
E-Mail

Locking Down Windows 10: 6 New Features

The latest version of Windows includes expanded identity and access controls, advanced Bitlocker encryption, and new malware protections.
2 of 7

Identity and Access Control: Windows Hello and Microsoft Passport

Passport and Hello are Microsoft's attempt to go passwordless. Microsoft Passport provides strong two-factor authentication (2FA), is fully integrated into Windows, and replaces passwords with the combination of an enrolled device and either a PIN or Windows Hello, Microsoft says. Similar to smart cards, but more flexible, Microsoft Passport uses an asymmetric key pair instead of a string comparison to perform authentication. The user's key material can be secured by hardware.  It also doesn't require extra infrastructure components required for smart card deployment such as public key infrastructure (PKI). If an organization already uses PKI in secure email or virtual private network authentication, users can use the existing infrastructure with Microsoft Passport. 

Windows Hello is the new biometric sign-in option for Microsoft Passport. Biometric authentication is built directly into the operating system, allowing Windows Hello users to unlock their devices by using their face or fingerprint. From there, authentication to the devices and resources is enabled through a combination of the user's unique biometric identifier and the device itself, Microsoft says. The user's biometric data that is used for Windows Hello is considered a local gesture and consequently doesn't roam among a user's devices and is not centrally stored.

The biometric image of the user the sensor takes is converted into an algorithmic form that cannot be converted back into the original image that the sensor took. Devices that have Trusted Platform Module 2.0 encrypt the biometric data in a form that makes it unreadable if the data is ever removed from the device. If multiple users share a device, each user will be able to enroll and use Windows Hello for his or her Windows profile.

However, Bromium's Crosby is somewhat skeptical about Microsoft Hello's utility in the enterprise, and it has limitation in all contexts.  'Windows Hello is about trying to get rid of passwords, which is an awesome step forward. Using biometrics to unlock the device is valuable to enterprises and consumers,' he says.  However, after logging onto the device, the users still type in username passwords to logon to websites.  'So it is not single-sign on for the masses.'

A long term goal is probably to have a Microsoft identity, something like a Microsoft Azure Active Directory identity, that would be users' identity online and they could use it to sign onto multiple websites such as Salesforce, SAP, or Facebook, Crosby says.

Microsoft is not there yet. Even though Microsoft is trying to get rid of passwords, all they have done initially - 'and I laud them for their efforts'- is to get rid of passwords required to get on to the device, Crosby says.  When the device talks to a Windows-centric enterprise infrastructure, users don't have to further use the passwords. But in a world of diverse applications, Microsoft can't currently enforce uniformity of identity and access across different domains.

Image Source: Google Image

Identity and Access Control: Windows Hello and Microsoft Passport

Passport and Hello are Microsofts attempt to go passwordless. Microsoft Passport provides strong two-factor authentication (2FA), is fully integrated into Windows, and replaces passwords with the combination of an enrolled device and either a PIN or Windows Hello, Microsoft says. Similar to smart cards, but more flexible, Microsoft Passport uses an asymmetric key pair instead of a string comparison to perform authentication. The users key material can be secured by hardware. It also doesnt require extra infrastructure components required for smart card deployment such as public key infrastructure (PKI). If an organization already uses PKI in secure email or virtual private network authentication, users can use the existing infrastructure with Microsoft Passport.

Windows Hello is the new biometric sign-in option for Microsoft Passport. Biometric authentication is built directly into the operating system, allowing Windows Hello users to unlock their devices by using their face or fingerprint. From there, authentication to the devices and resources is enabled through a combination of the users unique biometric identifier and the device itself, Microsoft says. The users biometric data that is used for Windows Hello is considered a local gesture and consequently doesnt roam among a users devices and is not centrally stored.

The biometric image of the user the sensor takes is converted into an algorithmic form that cannot be converted back into the original image that the sensor took. Devices that have Trusted Platform Module 2.0 encrypt the biometric data in a form that makes it unreadable if the data is ever removed from the device. If multiple users share a device, each user will be able to enroll and use Windows Hello for his or her Windows profile.

However, Bromiums Crosby is somewhat skeptical about Microsoft Hellos utility in the enterprise, and it has limitation in all contexts. Windows Hello is about trying to get rid of passwords, which is an awesome step forward. Using biometrics to unlock the device is valuable to enterprises and consumers, he says. However, after logging onto the device, the users still type in username passwords to logon to websites. So it is not single-sign on for the masses.

A long term goal is probably to have a Microsoft identity, something like a Microsoft Azure Active Directory identity, that would be users identity online and they could use it to sign onto multiple websites such as Salesforce, SAP, or Facebook, Crosby says.

Microsoft is not there yet. Even though Microsoft is trying to get rid of passwords, all they have done initially and I laud them for their efforts is to get rid of passwords required to get on to the device, Crosby says. When the device talks to a Windows-centric enterprise infrastructure, users dont have to further use the passwords. But in a world of diverse applications, Microsoft cant currently enforce uniformity of identity and access across different domains.

Image Source: Google Image

2 of 7
Comment  | 
Print  | 
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
Aviation Faces Increasing Cybersecurity Scrutiny
Kelly Jackson Higgins, Executive Editor at Dark Reading,  8/22/2019
Microsoft Tops Phishers' Favorite Brands as Facebook Spikes
Kelly Sheridan, Staff Editor, Dark Reading,  8/22/2019
MoviePass Leaves Credit Card Numbers, Personal Data Exposed Online
Kelly Sheridan, Staff Editor, Dark Reading,  8/21/2019
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon
Current Issue
7 Threats & Disruptive Forces Changing the Face of Cybersecurity
This Dark Reading Tech Digest gives an in-depth look at the biggest emerging threats and disruptive forces that are changing the face of cybersecurity today.
Flash Poll
The State of IT Operations and Cybersecurity Operations
The State of IT Operations and Cybersecurity Operations
Your enterprise's cyber risk may depend upon the relationship between the IT team and the security team. Heres some insight on what's working and what isn't in the data center.
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2016-6154
PUBLISHED: 2019-08-23
The authentication applet in Watchguard Fireware 11.11 Operating System has reflected XSS (this can also cause an open redirect).
CVE-2019-5594
PUBLISHED: 2019-08-23
An Improper Neutralization of Input During Web Page Generation ("Cross-site Scripting") in Fortinet FortiNAC 8.3.0 to 8.3.6 and 8.5.0 admin webUI may allow an unauthenticated attacker to perform a reflected XSS attack via the search field in the webUI.
CVE-2019-6695
PUBLISHED: 2019-08-23
Lack of root file system integrity checking in Fortinet FortiManager VM application images of all versions below 6.2.1 may allow an attacker to implant third-party programs by recreating the image through specific methods.
CVE-2019-12400
PUBLISHED: 2019-08-23
In version 2.0.3 Apache Santuario XML Security for Java, a caching mechanism was introduced to speed up creating new XML documents using a static pool of DocumentBuilders. However, if some untrusted code can register a malicious implementation with the thread context class loader first, then this im...
CVE-2019-15092
PUBLISHED: 2019-08-23
The webtoffee "WordPress Users & WooCommerce Customers Import Export" plugin 1.3.0 for WordPress allows CSV injection in the user_url, display_name, first_name, and last_name columns in an exported CSV file created by the WF_CustomerImpExpCsv_Exporter class.