Dark Reading is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

Vulnerabilities / Threats //

Insider Threats

3/25/2019
01:30 PM
50%
50%

IT Leaders, Employees Divided on Data Security

Execs and employees have dramatically different ideas of how much information is being lost and why - a gap that puts enterprise data in grave danger.

Management and employees have dramatically different views of how risky employee behavior can be. According to the results of a new security survey released today, that gap puts enterprise data in grave danger.

The survey, conducted by Opinion Matters and sponsored by Egress, includes the views of more than 250 IT leaders and more than 2,000 employees from the US and UK. It found more than three-quarters of the executives believe employees have accidentally put company data at risk in the past year. When employees answered the same question, 92% said they had not done anything to put data at risk.

When it comes to intentional breaches, the division is no less stark. Sixty-one percent of IT leaders said employees have maliciously put company data at risk, while 91% of employees said they've done no such thing. This kind of divide – in which employees are unaware of, or unwilling to admit their roles in, data loss – poses a particular challenge to IT leaders trying to educated their employees about good security practices.

There is more information within the data. For example, more than half (55%) of employees who admitted breaking company rules to share data said their organizations don't provide the tools required to securely share sensitive information. In addition, 29% of employees said they believe they have some form of ownership over data they have worked on as part of their jobs. This echoes another finding, that 20% of those who intentionally shared data did so because they felt that the information was theirs to share.

Read more here.

 

 

Join Dark Reading LIVE for two cybersecurity summits at Interop 2019. Learn from the industry's most knowledgeable IT security experts. Check out the Interop agenda here.

Dark Reading's Quick Hits delivers a brief synopsis and summary of the significance of breaking news events. For more information from the original source of the news item, please follow the link provided in this article. View Full Bio

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
RyanSepe
50%
50%
RyanSepe,
User Rank: Ninja
4/30/2019 | 11:05:38 PM
Re: Brief them properly
Definitely provides further context to the study. I still think its important to cite that different folks see things through different lenses. These differences help provide a more concrete basis to the study and in turn validate it.
DavidHamilton
50%
50%
DavidHamilton,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/30/2019 | 2:24:53 AM
Brief them properly
It is expected of employees to give their answers as such because they are not security experts. They have not been properly briefed regarding what are the risks involved during their daily work habits. They answered as such because they do not know any better.
RyanSepe
50%
50%
RyanSepe,
User Rank: Ninja
3/26/2019 | 9:53:45 AM
Risk Ownership
I think two facets come into play here. Ultimately, as data owners executives of said data are more heavily responsible for securing data at the company even though the data custodians (employees) directly touch said data. Due to this they way the risks more heavily and are more inclined to support data that creates a narrative that more needs to be done to secure the data. Employees on the other hand, and I believe the term is used to be department agnostic not security centric, support a business function. Many will not stop to think of the ramifications of what they are doing until they are told by a security function that it is not best practice. Due to this ignorance it is more than likely that those individuals surveyed would be inclined to think that they are not jeopardizing company data.
REISEN1955
50%
50%
REISEN1955,
User Rank: Ninja
3/25/2019 | 2:38:22 PM
Han Solo and Srgt. Schultz
Solp: It's not my fault.  Schultz:  I know nothing.  Of course employees are blameless, as there is that line called UNEMPLOYMENT and so they have done nothing wrong and if they did, well, it is the corp at fault because they did not provide security controls.  It was there, so, well I had to take it with me.  You never stopped me from walking into the safe (wide open anyway) and remove cash.  

Microsoft Patches Wormable RCE Vulns in Remote Desktop Services
Kelly Sheridan, Staff Editor, Dark Reading,  8/13/2019
The Mainframe Is Seeing a Resurgence. Is Security Keeping Pace?
Ray Overby, Co-Founder & President at Key Resources, Inc.,  8/15/2019
GitHub Named in Capital One Breach Lawsuit
Dark Reading Staff 8/14/2019
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon Contest
Current Issue
7 Threats & Disruptive Forces Changing the Face of Cybersecurity
This Dark Reading Tech Digest gives an in-depth look at the biggest emerging threats and disruptive forces that are changing the face of cybersecurity today.
Flash Poll
The State of Ransomware
The State of Ransomware
Ransomware has become one of the most prevalent new cybersecurity threats faced by today's enterprises. This new report from Dark Reading includes feedback from IT and IT security professionals about their organization's ransomware experiences, defense plans, and malware challenges. Find out what they had to say!
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2019-15224
PUBLISHED: 2019-08-19
The rest-client gem 1.6.13 for Ruby, as distributed on RubyGems.org, included a code-execution backdoor inserted by a third party.
CVE-2019-15225
PUBLISHED: 2019-08-19
In Envoy through 1.11.1, users may configure a route to match incoming path headers via the libstdc++ regular expression implementation. A remote attacker may send a request with a very long URI to result in a denial of service (memory consumption). This is a related issue to CVE-2019-14993.
CVE-2019-15223
PUBLISHED: 2019-08-19
An issue was discovered in the Linux kernel before 5.1.8. There is a NULL pointer dereference caused by a malicious USB device in the sound/usb/line6/driver.c driver.
CVE-2019-15211
PUBLISHED: 2019-08-19
An issue was discovered in the Linux kernel before 5.2.6. There is a use-after-free caused by a malicious USB device in the drivers/media/v4l2-core/v4l2-dev.c driver because drivers/media/radio/radio-raremono.c does not properly allocate memory.
CVE-2019-15212
PUBLISHED: 2019-08-19
An issue was discovered in the Linux kernel before 5.1.8. There is a double-free caused by a malicious USB device in the drivers/usb/misc/rio500.c driver.