Dark Reading is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

Vulnerabilities / Threats

8/13/2018
04:30 PM
Connect Directly
Google+
Twitter
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%

'Hack the Marine Corps' Bug Bounty Event Held in Vegas

$80K in payouts went to handpicked hackers in nine-hour event during DEF CON in Las Vegas.

The US Marine Corps yesterday in Las Vegas held a live hacking event focused on its public-facing websites and enterprise services, and it paid out $80,000 in total to researchers for 75 new vulnerabilities that they found.

Hack the Marines, part of the US Department of Defense's Hack the Pentagon program, operated as a hackathon of sorts, with a limited-time bounty payout; researchers also can report any flaws they find through the HackerOne-managed Marine Corps vulnerability disclosure program until August 26, 2018, but without earning a bounty.

This represents the sixth bug bounty sponsored by the DoD and managed by HackerOne, following the flagship Hack the Pentagon program in 2016, and bug bounties for the Army, Air Force, and the DoD's travel system.

Around 100 researchers selected by HackerOne and the Marines competed in the bug bounty event, which ran for nine hours on Sunday, August 12. HackerOne and the Marines would not divulge details on the newly found vulnerabilities, but the bugs included the usual website flaw suspects, including authentication flaws and cross-site scripting, according to Martin Mickos, CEO of HackerOne.

The Marine Corps Cyberspace Command's red and blue teams were on hand as well to observe and interact with the hacker competitors as well as to decide on the winning bounties. "They key goal of these live hacking events is to have this collegial and social [atmosphere], although it's also a competition," Mickos says. "They may give advice ... 'don't go there, look here'" to the competitors, while the hackers also can give the military feedback as well, he says.

"Hack the Marine Corps allows us to leverage the talents of the global ethical hacker community to take an honest, hard look at our current cybersecurity posture," said Maj. Gen. Matthew Glavy, Commander, US Marine Corps Forces Cyberspace Command in a statement. "What we learn from this program will assist the Marine Corps in improving our warfighting platform, the Marine Corps Enterprise Network. Working with the ethical hacker community provides us with a large return on investment to identify and mitigate current critical vulnerabilities, reduce attack surfaces, and minimize future vulnerabilities. It will make us more combat ready."

In all, the Hack the Pentagon program itself has resulted in over 5,000 discovered vulnerabilities by researchers.

Related Content:

Learn from the industry's most knowledgeable CISOs and IT security experts in a setting that is conducive to interaction and conversation. Early bird rate ends August 31. Click for more info

Kelly Jackson Higgins is the Executive Editor of Dark Reading. She is an award-winning veteran technology and business journalist with more than two decades of experience in reporting and editing for various publications, including Network Computing, Secure Enterprise ... View Full Bio

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
Why Cyber-Risk Is a C-Suite Issue
Marc Wilczek, Digital Strategist & CIO Advisor,  11/12/2019
Black Hat Q&A: Hacking a '90s Sports Car
Black Hat Staff, ,  11/7/2019
The Cold Truth about Cyber Insurance
Chris Kennedy, CISO & VP Customer Success, AttackIQ,  11/7/2019
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon Contest
Current Issue
7 Threats & Disruptive Forces Changing the Face of Cybersecurity
This Dark Reading Tech Digest gives an in-depth look at the biggest emerging threats and disruptive forces that are changing the face of cybersecurity today.
Flash Poll
Rethinking Enterprise Data Defense
Rethinking Enterprise Data Defense
Frustrated with recurring intrusions and breaches, cybersecurity professionals are questioning some of the industrys conventional wisdom. Heres a look at what theyre thinking about.
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2019-18954
PUBLISHED: 2019-11-14
Pomelo v2.2.5 allows external control of critical state data. A malicious user input can corrupt arbitrary methods and attributes in template/game-server/app/servers/connector/handler/entryHandler.js because certain internal attributes can be overwritten via a conflicting name. Hence, a malicious at...
CVE-2019-3640
PUBLISHED: 2019-11-14
Unprotected Transport of Credentials in ePO extension in McAfee Data Loss Prevention 11.x prior to 11.4.0 allows remote attackers with access to the network to collect login details to the LDAP server via the ePO extension not using a secure connection when testing LDAP connectivity.
CVE-2019-3661
PUBLISHED: 2019-11-14
Improper Neutralization of Special Elements used in an SQL Command ('SQL Injection') in McAfee Advanced Threat Defense (ATD) prior to 4.8 allows remote authenticated attacker to execute database commands via carefully constructed time based payloads.
CVE-2019-3662
PUBLISHED: 2019-11-14
Path Traversal: '/absolute/pathname/here' vulnerability in McAfee Advanced Threat Defense (ATD) prior to 4.8 allows remote authenticated attacker to gain unintended access to files on the system via carefully constructed HTTP requests.
CVE-2019-3663
PUBLISHED: 2019-11-14
Unprotected Storage of Credentials vulnerability in McAfee Advanced Threat Defense (ATD) prior to 4.8 allows local attacker to gain access to the root password via accessing sensitive files on the system.