theDocumentId => 1141446 Defending Against Targeted Attacks Requires Human ...

Dark Reading is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

Vulnerabilities / Threats

Defending Against Targeted Attacks Requires Human Touch, Speakers Say

Targeted attacks involve a human element that can be detected and stopped, speakers say at Dark Reading event

BOSTON -- SECURITY Conference 2014 -- Targeted attacks tend to be tailored individually, giving them an almost human quality that can be fingerprinted and prevented, according to speakers here on Thursday.

In a live event presented by Dark Reading and InformationWeek and sponsored by Trend Micro, keynote speakers and panelists offered a look at targeted attacks and how to defend against them.

While traditional cyberdefenses have generally focused on building a shield against mass-produced malware, targeted attacks are frequently unique and require a different sort of defense, the speakers said.

"We encourage enterprises to refocus their attention on who the attacker is, rather than just the methods they use," said keynote speaker George Kurtz, CEO and co-founder of CrowdStrike, which offers big data analysis and attribution services. "What we always say is that [enterprises] don't have a malware problem -- they have an adversary problem."

Trend Micro's J.D. Sherry pointed out that while targeted attacks tend to be tailored to the victim, they aren't always sophisticated. "In fact, most of these attacks are actually not very advanced," he said. "Many of them involve vulnerabilities that are years old and that could have been prevented if the victims had just stayed up-to-date with their patches."

Ninety-nine percent of targeted attacks are manually operated, which gives them an almost human quality that is quite different from mass-produced malware, said Harry Sverdlove, CTO of Bit9. "To detect this sort of attack usually means correlating several events on your network," he said.

Targeted attacks require a series of steps that can be stopped if they can be recognized, said Tim "TK" Keanini CTO at Lancope. "The bad guy has to pull off an entire process that may involve four to eight steps without being detected," he said. "And if they are detected, they have to start all over again. Interrupting this 'kill chain' is the key to increasing the attacker's cost and making it more difficult to complete the process."

Have a comment on this story? Please click "Add a Comment" below. If you'd like to contact Dark Reading's editors directly, send us a message. Tim Wilson is Editor in Chief and co-founder of Dark Reading.com, UBM Tech's online community for information security professionals. He is responsible for managing the site, assigning and editing content, and writing breaking news stories. Wilson has been recognized as one ... View Full Bio

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Threaded  |  Newest First  |  Oldest First
Edge-DRsplash-10-edge-articles
I Smell a RAT! New Cybersecurity Threats for the Crypto Industry
David Trepp, Partner, IT Assurance with accounting and advisory firm BPM LLP,  7/9/2021
News
Attacks on Kaseya Servers Led to Ransomware in Less Than 2 Hours
Robert Lemos, Contributing Writer,  7/7/2021
Commentary
It's in the Game (but It Shouldn't Be)
Tal Memran, Cybersecurity Expert, CYE,  7/9/2021
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon
Current Issue
The State of Cybersecurity Incident Response
In this report learn how enterprises are building their incident response teams and processes, how they research potential compromises, how they respond to new breaches, and what tools and processes they use to remediate problems and improve their cyber defenses for the future.
Flash Poll
How Enterprises are Developing Secure Applications
How Enterprises are Developing Secure Applications
Recent breaches of third-party apps are driving many organizations to think harder about the security of their off-the-shelf software as they continue to move left in secure software development practices.
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2021-32686
PUBLISHED: 2021-07-23
PJSIP is a free and open source multimedia communication library written in C language implementing standard based protocols such as SIP, SDP, RTP, STUN, TURN, and ICE. In PJSIP before version 2.11.1, there are a couple of issues found in the SSL socket. First, a race condition between callback and ...
CVE-2021-32783
PUBLISHED: 2021-07-23
Contour is a Kubernetes ingress controller using Envoy proxy. In Contour before version 1.17.1 a specially crafted ExternalName type Service may be used to access Envoy's admin interface, which Contour normally prevents from access outside the Envoy container. This can be used to shut down Envoy rem...
CVE-2021-3169
PUBLISHED: 2021-07-23
An issue in Jumpserver 2.6.2 and below allows attackers to create a connection token through an API which does not have access control and use it to access sensitive assets.
CVE-2020-20741
PUBLISHED: 2021-07-23
Incorrect Access Control in Beckhoff Automation GmbH & Co. KG CX9020 with firmware version CX9020_CB3011_WEC7_HPS_v602_TC31_B4016.6 allows remote attackers to bypass authentication via the "CE Remote Display Tool" as it does not close the incoming connection on the Windows CE side if t...
CVE-2021-25808
PUBLISHED: 2021-07-23
A code injection vulnerability in backup/plugin.php of Bludit 3.13.1 allows attackers to execute arbitrary code via a crafted ZIP file.