Dark Reading is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

Vulnerabilities / Threats

Dark Reading's Seven-Year Itch

After seven years of covering the security industry, Dark Reading is just getting started

Seven years ago today, Dark Reading made its first appearance on the Web. The publication, like the security industry itself, has changed a great deal since May 1, 2006 -- and yet, as with the industry, many core themes remain constant.

When we launched Dark Reading, our goal was to build a single website where security professionals could go to find all of the information they needed about new threats and methods for stopping them.

In those days, nobody was talking about the cloud or advanced persistent threats or bring your own device. One of the biggest breaches that year was at the Department of Veterans Affairs, where an employee brought work home on a laptop that was subsequently stolen. One of our most popular stories was a penetration test by blogger Steve Stasiukonis, who put a benign infection on a bunch of thumb drives and placed them all over a company headquarters site (almost all of them were plugged into company computers).

Over the years, businesses have been inundated with new attacks ranging from Stuxnet to Storm, from Anonymous to Zeus. And yet, those lost laptops and infected thumb drives continue to be a problem for most enterprises.

In 2006, we were writing about the features of antivirus and IPS products, noting their particular flaws and inability to prevent attacks from penetrating. The integrity of the security perimeter was at risk.

Since then, we've seen the launch of a wide range of technologies and strategies, from next-generation firewalls to data leak prevention to threat intelligence services. And yet, experts are still complaining about the failure of AV technology, and most have all but given up the idea of maintaining a secure perimeter.

Perhaps the lesson we're taught from the past seven years is that while attacks and technology change, the nature of security itself doesn't. We may be dealing with an unprecedented volume and sophistication of malware, but that doesn't change the fact that humans are at the heart of most of our defenses -- and most of our compromises. And security, like everything else that's human, is a work in progress.

For Dark Reading's part, our pledge is to continue to strive to be that single source of news and information that you need in your efforts as a security professional. We've taken some steps recently to improve our content, such as the redesign launched in April, and we have more plans in store for improving the usefulness and interactivity of the site. We have an itch to take this site to a new level, and we look forward to the days ahead.

And for those of you who have been reading us over these past seven years, thank you. We hope we'll continue to be one of your primary sites for security news and information for another seven years -- and beyond.

--Tim Wilson, Kelly Jackson Higgins, and the staff and contributors of Dark Reading Tim Wilson is Editor in Chief and co-founder of Dark Reading.com, UBM Tech's online community for information security professionals. He is responsible for managing the site, assigning and editing content, and writing breaking news stories. Wilson has been recognized as one ... View Full Bio

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
jc
50%
50%
jc,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/2/2013 | 3:14:37 PM
re: Dark Reading's Seven-Year Itch
Happy Birthday Dark Reading!
Major Brazilian Bank Tests Homomorphic Encryption on Financial Data
Kelly Sheridan, Staff Editor, Dark Reading,  1/10/2020
Exploits Released for As-Yet Unpatched Critical Citrix Flaw
Jai Vijayan, Contributing Writer,  1/13/2020
Microsoft Patches Windows Vuln Discovered by the NSA
Kelly Sheridan, Staff Editor, Dark Reading,  1/14/2020
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon Contest
Write a Caption, Win a Starbucks Card! Click Here
Latest Comment: This comment is waiting for review by our moderators.
Current Issue
The Year in Security: 2019
This Tech Digest provides a wrap up and overview of the year's top cybersecurity news stories. It was a year of new twists on old threats, with fears of another WannaCry-type worm and of a possible botnet army of Wi-Fi routers. But 2019 also underscored the risk of firmware and trusted security tools harboring dangerous holes that cybercriminals and nation-state hackers could readily abuse. Read more.
Flash Poll
[Just Released] How Enterprises are Attacking the Cybersecurity Problem
[Just Released] How Enterprises are Attacking the Cybersecurity Problem
Organizations have invested in a sweeping array of security technologies to address challenges associated with the growing number of cybersecurity attacks. However, the complexity involved in managing these technologies is emerging as a major problem. Read this report to find out what your peers biggest security challenges are and the technologies they are using to address them.
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2019-20003
PUBLISHED: 2020-01-17
Feldtech easescreen Crystal 9.0 Web-Services 9.0.1.16265 allows Stored XSS via the Debug-Log and Display-Log components. This could be exploited when an attacker sends an crafted string for FTP authentication.
CVE-2019-3686
PUBLISHED: 2020-01-17
openQA before commit c172e8883d8f32fced5e02f9b6faaacc913df27b was vulnerable to XSS in the distri and version parameter. This was reported through the bug bounty program of Offensive Security
CVE-2019-3683
PUBLISHED: 2020-01-17
The keystone-json-assignment package in SUSE Openstack Cloud 8 before commit d7888c75505465490250c00cc0ef4bb1af662f9f every user listed in the /etc/keystone/user-project-map.json was assigned full "member" role access to every project. This allowed these users to access, modify, create and...
CVE-2019-3682
PUBLISHED: 2020-01-17
The docker-kubic package in SUSE CaaS Platform 3.0 before 17.09.1_ce-7.6.1 provided access to an insecure API locally on the Kubernetes master node.
CVE-2019-17361
PUBLISHED: 2020-01-17
In SaltStack Salt through 2019.2.0, the salt-api NEST API with the ssh client enabled is vulnerable to command injection. This allows an unauthenticated attacker with network access to the API endpoint to execute arbitrary code on the salt-api host.