Dark Reading is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

Vulnerabilities / Threats //

Advanced Threats

3/14/2017
12:00 PM
Black Hat Staff
Black Hat Staff
Event Updates
50%
50%

Black Hat Review Board Spotlight:
Beyond the Bio with Jamie Butler

Get to know the Black Hat Review Board in a new interview series, Beyond the Bio. In this series, Black Hat Review Board Members offer insight from their favorite exploits and pastimes to their most memorable Black Hat experiences.

In this issue, Black Hat interviews Jamie Butler, Chief Technology Officer at Endgame.

Why did you choose your profession?

I was attracted to computer security at a young age because I felt it was me against the machine.  That machine could be very expensive and owned by a corporation or a nation.  With a small investment in a personal computer, one can truly take on the world.  Hacking helped democratize the world for me.

Who’s someone in the community you’ve never met, but would like to?

I would really like to meet Steve Wozniak and learn more about the early days of hardware hacking.

What’s the biggest issue facing InfoSec that needs to be solved?

The biggest issues facing the industry today is lack of transparency among security vendors. Organizations spent $75 billion on security last year, yet they are still being breached at an alarming rate. Nonetheless, vendors are still making promises about their technology that they can’t keep, leading to confusion and discontentment amongst organizations. The InfoSec industry as a whole needs to commit to being more open and explicit about how their capabilities can solve problems for customers.

Have you ever been hacked?

Well, that depends on your definition of hacked.  My corporate laptop was infected once in 2003 by the Blaster worm. At the time, I had two endpoint protection products running on my laptop; however, they were in detect only mode. When I dug into the logs of the products, I saw that they had both detected the buffer overflow.  I was curious into how the protection software worked and how it could be bypassed.  This research led to the Phrack Volume 0x0b, Issue 0x3e, Phile #0x05 article.

How do you “unplug” in your free time?

After a long day at work, I need thirty minutes to an hour of television or movies – something to watch or have on that is completely mind numbing.  When I have a day to myself, I usually chose to read a biography or some other non-fiction book related to technology, entrepreneurship, or finance.

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
Commentary
What the FedEx Logo Taught Me About Cybersecurity
Matt Shea, Head of Federal @ MixMode,  6/4/2021
Edge-DRsplash-10-edge-articles
A View From Inside a Deception
Sara Peters, Senior Editor at Dark Reading,  6/2/2021
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon
Current Issue
The State of Cybersecurity Incident Response
In this report learn how enterprises are building their incident response teams and processes, how they research potential compromises, how they respond to new breaches, and what tools and processes they use to remediate problems and improve their cyber defenses for the future.
Flash Poll
The State of Ransomware
The State of Ransomware
Ransomware has become one of the most prevalent new cybersecurity threats faced by today's enterprises. This new report from Dark Reading includes feedback from IT and IT security professionals about their organization's ransomware experiences, defense plans, and malware challenges. Find out what they had to say!
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2021-32552
PUBLISHED: 2021-06-12
It was discovered that read_file() in apport/hookutils.py would follow symbolic links or open FIFOs. When this function is used by the openjdk-16 package apport hooks, it could expose private data to other local users.
CVE-2021-32553
PUBLISHED: 2021-06-12
It was discovered that read_file() in apport/hookutils.py would follow symbolic links or open FIFOs. When this function is used by the openjdk-17 package apport hooks, it could expose private data to other local users.
CVE-2021-32554
PUBLISHED: 2021-06-12
It was discovered that read_file() in apport/hookutils.py would follow symbolic links or open FIFOs. When this function is used by the xorg package apport hooks, it could expose private data to other local users.
CVE-2021-32555
PUBLISHED: 2021-06-12
It was discovered that read_file() in apport/hookutils.py would follow symbolic links or open FIFOs. When this function is used by the xorg-hwe-18.04 package apport hooks, it could expose private data to other local users.
CVE-2021-32556
PUBLISHED: 2021-06-12
It was discovered that the get_modified_conffiles() function in backends/packaging-apt-dpkg.py allowed injecting modified package names in a manner that would confuse the dpkg(1) call.