theDocumentId => 1339082 A 7-Step Cybersecurity Plan for Healthcare ...

Dark Reading is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

Vulnerabilities / Threats

10/12/2020
10:00 AM
Steve Zurier
Steve Zurier
Slideshows
Connect Directly
Twitter
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%

A 7-Step Cybersecurity Plan for Healthcare Organizations

With National Cybersecurity Awareness Month shining a spotlight on the healthcare industry, security pros share best practices for those charged with protecting these essential organizations.
Previous
1 of 8
Next

Image Source: Adobe Stock: denisismagilov

Image Source: Adobe Stock: denisismagilov

Healthcare organizations, on the front line of combating COVID-19, are under enormous pressure to adapt to new technologies amid work-from-home realities and the escalating cyber threat landscape.

That's why as part of National Cybersecurity Awareness Month, the National Cyber Security Alliance (NCSA) and the Department of Homeland Security's Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) are focusing on the healthcare industry. In Dark Reading's own discussions with healthcare security experts, most say ransomware and antiquated medical technology are the industry's greatest threats, not distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks as some have feared.

Related Content:

Latest Version of MalLocker Android Ransomware Packs New Tricks

2020 State of Cybersecurity Operations and Incident Response

New on The Edge: Emotet 101: How the Ransomware Works -- and Why It's So Darn Effective

"The hackers are businessmen, and for them time is money," says Torsten George, cybersecurity evangelist at Centrify. "It's much more difficult to make money on a DDoS attack. They would have to do the attack and press for a ransom. Overall, the medical world has done well on the administrative side of technology, but I worry more about the vulnerabilities in antiquated firmware in old medical equipment, such as ventilators and heart pumps.”

Piyush Pandey, CEO of Appsian, adds that medical organizations need to start thinking more like tech companies.

"Today large investment banks such as Goldman Sachs and Morgan Stanley think of themselves as technology companies first. That's what has to happen in the medical field as they adapt new technologies, such as telehealth,” Pandey says. "Medical people have to invest in technology in the same way."

Stopping breaches because of bad password management and keeping data safe during telehealth calls are top priorities for medical organizations. Security teams at these organizations have a lot to unpack. This list can help set priorities and pave the path forward.

 

Steve Zurier has more than 30 years of journalism and publishing experience and has covered networking, security, and IT as a writer and editor since 1992. Steve is based in Columbia, Md. View Full Bio
 

Recommended Reading:

Previous
1 of 8
Next
Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
Ittiey
50%
50%
Ittiey,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/15/2020 | 8:21:11 AM
A 7-Step Cybersecurity Plan for Healthcare Organizations
Interesting article
Edge-DRsplash-10-edge-articles
I Smell a RAT! New Cybersecurity Threats for the Crypto Industry
David Trepp, Partner, IT Assurance with accounting and advisory firm BPM LLP,  7/9/2021
News
Attacks on Kaseya Servers Led to Ransomware in Less Than 2 Hours
Robert Lemos, Contributing Writer,  7/7/2021
Commentary
It's in the Game (but It Shouldn't Be)
Tal Memran, Cybersecurity Expert, CYE,  7/9/2021
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon
Current Issue
The State of Cybersecurity Incident Response
In this report learn how enterprises are building their incident response teams and processes, how they research potential compromises, how they respond to new breaches, and what tools and processes they use to remediate problems and improve their cyber defenses for the future.
Flash Poll
How Enterprises are Developing Secure Applications
How Enterprises are Developing Secure Applications
Recent breaches of third-party apps are driving many organizations to think harder about the security of their off-the-shelf software as they continue to move left in secure software development practices.
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2021-23416
PUBLISHED: 2021-07-28
This affects all versions of package curly-bracket-parser. When used as a template library, it does not properly sanitize the user input.
CVE-2021-23417
PUBLISHED: 2021-07-28
All versions of package deepmergefn are vulnerable to Prototype Pollution via deepMerge function.
CVE-2021-23415
PUBLISHED: 2021-07-28
This affects the package elFinder.AspNet before 1.1.1. The user-controlled file name is not properly sanitized before it is used to create a file system path.
CVE-2020-4974
PUBLISHED: 2021-07-28
IBM Jazz Foundation products are vulnerable to server side request forgery (SSRF). This may allow an authenticated attacker to send unauthorized requests from the system, potentially leading to network enumeration or facilitating other attacks. IBM X-Force ID: 192434.
CVE-2020-5004
PUBLISHED: 2021-07-28
IBM Jazz Foundation products are vulnerable to cross-site scripting. This vulnerability allows users to embed arbitrary JavaScript code in the Web UI thus altering the intended functionality potentially leading to credentials disclosure within a trusted session. IBM X-Force ID: 192957.