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Vulnerabilities / Threats

6/7/2018
10:00 AM

7 Variants (So Far) of Mirai

Mirai is an example of the newest trend in rapidly evolving, constantly improving malware. These seven variants show how threat actors are making bad malware worse.
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OMG
The old saying goes, 'There's more than one way to skin a cat.' There's also more than one way to monetize a botnet, and the OMG Mirai variant takes a commercial tack that is far removed from the original.
Where all the variants of Mirai discussed so far were DDoS engines, OMG, just like the original, uses 3proxy, an open source proxy server, to turn any infected device into a proxy server that can then be used for a variety of purposes. OMG even goes so far as to check for, and rewrite, firewall rules to ensure that the ports used by the new proxy server can transit the network perimeter with no trouble.
OMG provides a network of proxy servers that can be rented out for use by a huge number of clients, whether they're looking for DDoS generators, a SPAM network, crypto-jacker scheme, or ransomware empire. No matter the demand, the OMG proxy network can provide the illicit proxy.
(Image: BeeBright VIA SHUTTERSTOCK)

OMG

The old saying goes, "There's more than one way to skin a cat." There's also more than one way to monetize a botnet, and the OMG Mirai variant takes a commercial tack that is far removed from the original.

Where all the variants of Mirai discussed so far were DDoS engines, OMG, just like the original, uses 3proxy, an open source proxy server, to turn any infected device into a proxy server that can then be used for a variety of purposes. OMG even goes so far as to check for, and rewrite, firewall rules to ensure that the ports used by the new proxy server can transit the network perimeter with no trouble.

OMG provides a network of proxy servers that can be rented out for use by a huge number of clients, whether they're looking for DDoS generators, a SPAM network, crypto-jacker scheme, or ransomware empire. No matter the demand, the OMG proxy network can provide the illicit proxy.

(Image: BeeBright VIA SHUTTERSTOCK)

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MarkSindone
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MarkSindone,
User Rank: Apprentice
12/22/2018 | 1:30:53 AM
Under control
Malware, like technology, is constantly improving. There really isn't any particular one way that can totally diminish this entire threat for good. However, it is still in our best interests that we take note of them so as to know what to expect and how to handle and take them down for good using the correct methods. If we find out about them without knowing the counter measures to be put in place, then we might suffer even tougher consequences that might just be irreversible.
PaulChau
50%
50%
PaulChau,
User Rank: Apprentice
12/18/2018 | 2:59:56 AM
Beat the robots
It's scary to think that there are more than people trying to introduce hazards and dangers into our systems you know. These bots are so easily configured to attack from a different angle just by switching up a line or two of code! Security teams are really going to have to work hard to stay ahead of the game now!
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